African American

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Synonyms for African American

an American whose ancestors were born in Africa

References in periodicals archive ?
The study included 197 adolescents, 12 to 14 years old, selected from three ethnic Colombian communities; 33% of them are mestizo from the city of Cali (Valle del Cauca), 35% Afroamerican from Puerto Tejada (Cauca) and 32% indian from a Ticuna community living in Leticia (Amazonas).
The music that I fancy growing up is rooted in the AfroAmerican brand from the BabyBoomers era, maybe because the type of music is highly spiritual and has a strong meditative and emotional feel.
Philadelphia Stats: 52 stations, 62% subscribers, AfroAmerican 21%, Spanish 8%, Swings + 1.8 as Rym Oldies WPHI/FM doubles its share and -- 0.7 for Country WUSN.
one of the main differences between the work of those writers who comprise the socalled literary 'mainstream' in the United States and that of major Latin American authors from the Caribbean is the way in which the latter group accepts AfroAmerican culture as a vital part of its cultural identity.
(8) As part of the preparations for the Comintern's Sixth World Congress, Haywood presented a paper arguing that AfroAmerican people had a distinct 'national minority status' to a sub-committee on the 'Negro Question'.
Within the context of racial segregation in the 1960s ("separate but equal"), Gaustad is at pains to draw an image of AfroAmerican religion in the United States, but due to lack of empirical data he restricts his cartographic representations to a general map showing the "per cent negroes (szc!) in the total population, by States: 1950" (p.151).
Departments of History and Afroamerican & African Studies and Doctoral Program in Anthropology & History, University of Michigan
Walker has now been invited to speak at the University of Michigan's annual Zora Neale Hurston Lecture on behalf of the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies (DS) and the CEW.
The new world negro: Selected papers in Afroamerican studies.
See "Africa, Industrial Policy, and Export Processing Zones: Lessons from Asia," by Howard Stein, Center for Afroamerican and African Studies, University of Michigan, July 2008; and ILO, Economic and Social Effects of Multinational Enterprises in Export Processing Zones, 1988, p.
Flash of the Spirit: African and AfroAmerican Art and Philosophy.
Latinas and AfroAmerican women at work: race, gender and economic inequality, (pp.