Afro-Asiatic


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Related to Afro-Asiatic: Indo-European, Nilo-Saharan, Niger-Congo, Sino-Tibetan
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Synonyms for Afro-Asiatic

References in periodicals archive ?
Part I, "Comparative Afro-Asiatic (Hamito-Semitic)," contains seven papers.
401-12); Tesfay Tewolde, "Tigrinya Personal and Possessive Pronouns within Afro-Asiatic Context" (pp.
Activity is positively correlated with temperature and reaches a maximum between 28[degrees]C and 30[degrees]C; activity decreases when the temperature drops and, for the traditional Afro-Asiatic vector C.
Africa -tirc Central 47 Oromo, Afro-Asiatic Africa ofii Afaan
He is currently working on a book-length project entitled Black Dragon: Toward an Afro-Asiatic Imagination.
Celtic languages - Irish, Scots Gaelic and Welsh - have grammatical traits found in Afro-Asiatic tongues, according to research published in Science Week magazine.
After establishing the question of autonomy or theonomy of human rights, Possenti examines two non-Western objections, namely the Afro-Asiatic and the Islamic, to the universality of human rights.
In 1987 Martin Bernal published the first volume of a projected trilogy entitled Black Athena: The Afro-Asiatic Roots of Classical Civilization (Rutgers UP).
They were a diverse people speaking various Afro-Asiatic dialects.
This volume continues the impressive undertaking of Takacs (Eotvos Lorand University, Hungary), presenting the Afro-Asiatic parallels to the Egyptian roots with initial m-.
Tamashek is a division of Tuareg, the southern branch of Berber, which is part of the Afro-Asiatic or Hamito-Semitic family of languages.
378) does correct an alleged geographical fact presented in Johnstone's "The Modern South Arabian Languages," Afro-Asiatic Linguistics 1.
More significant omissions are an introductory chapter or chapters covering the Semitic family in general, its essential characteristics, and its Afro-Asiatic relatives, and a discussion of Proto-Semitic (com pare the three introductory chapters in the just-mentioned Indo-European volume: "The Indo-Europeans: Origins and Culture"; "Proto-Indo-European: Comparison and Reconstruction"; "The Indo-European Linguistic Family: Genetic and Typological Perspectives").
We read that Nostratic is the "protolanguage above the Indo-European and the Afro-Asiatic group," and that "even more audacious conjectures seek to incorporate both Indo-European and Afro-Asiatic with Caucasian, UraloAltaic and Dravidian in a Borean macro-family" (ibid.
Volume one includes articles on Semitic (the more extensively covered family in the collection) and other Afro-Asiatic languages.