African American Vernacular English

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Related to African American vernacular: Black English Vernacular
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Synonyms for African American Vernacular English

a nonstandard form of American English characteristically spoken by African Americans in the United States

References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, slang could be contrasted with colloquialism, non-standard language, vulgarism, taboo, euphemism, jargon, idiom, neologism or dialect, while African American could be compared to African American Vernacular English, Afro-American Vernacular English, Black English Vernacular, Ebonics or Gangsta Talk.
While the use of African American Vernacular English (AAVE) challenges the literacy conventions expected in many academic settings, "traditional" teaching practices have often failed to address this vital matter of language diversity (Hollie, 2001; Moore, 1996; Ogbu, 1999; Wheeler and Swords, 2004).
Although Wall identifies worrying the line as an element of the blues tradition, it clearly operates in other African American vernacular music as well.
My response to them was that this sentence in African American Vernacular English (AAVF) revealed much more about this teacher's relationship with her student than would the statement "I have known her for ten years.
His bringing together of African and African American performers and choreographers with those steeped in jazz, tap, and other styles influenced by African American vernacular dance forms made for a rich and at times explosive experience.
Gates and McKay's choice acknowledges that there might be some difficulty in understanding the changing African American vernacular as it is represented in writing.
The quilts in this exhibition, created by 45 women, are drawn from the extensive collection of Tinwood Alliance, a non-profit foundation founded by art scholar William Arnet for the understanding and support of African American vernacular art.
In Toni Cade Bambara's short story, "The Lesson" (1972), the narrator, Sylvia, speaks and narrates in African American Vernacular English (AAVE).
Kim, and Dorothy Graber); (10) "The Color Line: African American Vernacular English and Computerized Grammar Checkers" (Janet Bean); (11) "Diversity: An Assignment for Basic Writing Students" (Marcia Ribble); (12) "Using Assessment Techniques in a Racially and Ethnically Diverse Classroom" (Jennifer Rene Young); and (13) "In Our Own Voices: Liberating Race from the Margins" (Judy Massey Dozier).
Completing an accurate phonetic transcription of a speaker of African American Vernacular English (AAVE) requires knowledge of the range of phonological features possible and the inherently variable nature of their actual use.
Long before the fracas over Ebonies, or African American Vernacular English, erupted in Oakland three years ago, Frey had been incorporating his students' expressions into his lessons.
For Brown, African American vernacular jazz dance performance such as the bop, the shout and the disco have their roots in African-derived sacred and secular dances/rituals.
Their efforts to preserve and share the songs that they heard on their travels have culminated in a working archive that provides researchers with a complete experience of African American vernacular music.
One reason for this neglect, the study argues, is the absence of a protocol for reading, one that does not construct a binary opposition between formalist literary culture and African American vernacular culture.
Key points addressed include the socio-political contexts within which ways of thinking about language emerged; how these ways of thinking about sign languages, indigenous literacies, or African American Vernacular may militate against the development of radically different and possibly more nuanced understandings of language; and ways in which revising how we think about language affects the nature of the language teaching materials we develop and our language-teaching goals.
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