affinity

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  • noun

Synonyms for affinity

Synonyms for affinity

Synonyms for affinity

(immunology) the attraction between an antigen and an antibody

(biology) state of relationship between organisms or groups of organisms resulting in resemblance in structure or structural parts

a close connection marked by community of interests or similarity in nature or character

the force attracting atoms to each other and binding them together in a molecule

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inherent resemblance between persons or things

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a natural attraction or feeling of kinship

References in periodicals archive ?
The females are more sociable than males, so agonistic behaviour between them is less frequent, and affinitive behaviour more so than males.
It is well known that the acidity of the sulfate catalyst is affinitive to its calcination temperature.
Service providers that specialize in creating these types of communities include Affinitive, Web Crossing, and Capable Networks.
Like scientists who look through microscopes to view the smallest structures of living creatures and then record them in fine detail, these poets move away from emblematic, allegorical representations of nature to represent the natural world as they observe it, "subordinat[ing] figurative meaning to observation, question[ing] or discard[ing] oppressive hierarchal assumptions, and express[ing] specific and affinitive perception of actual animals, plants, elements, and processes" (5).
Since then she has made various works that articulate an affinitive yet ambiguous relationship between physical space and the representation of the plane.
There are many factors affecting the affinitive, adsorption, coordinating capabilities of chelating resins toward metal ions.
Again, this is partly to do with velocity, with a spectral construction of logical and affinitive relations through which the user travels so quickly and frictionlessly as to perceive only an undifferentiated white light.
In this case, "the self in Daoism is a fractal self, one that potentially can seamlessly interweave its being with affinitive systems, or attractors in the world, whose organization is now recognized to transcend classic dimensionality" (Jones and Culliney, 644).
Conversion, as DeWeese is the first to point out, is a most complex phenomenon, and since this study successfully highlights the processes by which affinitive elements of Islam and indigenous Inner Asian religious beliefs and practices converged in history, one feels a definite need for studies that approach the subject from the opposite direction of divergence and conflict.