cellular respiration

(redirected from Aerobic glycolysis)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.
Related to Aerobic glycolysis: Anaerobic glycolysis
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for cellular respiration

the metabolic processes whereby certain organisms obtain energy from organic molecules

References in periodicals archive ?
In adolescents and young adults, a considerable portion of brain sugar also is devoted to aerobic glycolysis, but the fraction drops steadily with age, leveling off at very low amounts by the time people are in their 60s.
M2-like activated macrophages exploit fatty acid oxidation (FAO) to fuel OXPHOS rather than aerobic glycolysis for ATP production [30-32].
This microenvironment at this rim of tumor cells further favors tumor growth, particularly when the intermediates of aerobic glycolysis provide the building blocks of tumor biomass [10, 41].
All examined GSC lines use aerobic glycolysis even if lines #1 and #163 of cluster 1, at lower extent, indicated lower lactate extrusion.
Verma, "Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 activation by aerobic glycolysis implicates the Warburg effect in carcinogenesis," Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol.
This is also known as aerobic glycolysis or the "Warburg effect" [55], a metabolic hallmark of cancer.
For example, while ATP production is typically viewed as requiring efficient mitochondrial respiration in neurons, aerobic glycolysis occurs under physiological conditions in certain regions of the brain, such as the parietal cortex and prefrontal cortex, especially during development (Vaishnavi et al., 2010; Goyal et al., 2014).
It works by increasing glucose transport and aerobic glycolysis.
It works by increasing glucose transport and aerobic glycolysis. But during this time of life, as estrogen wanes, it becomes uncoupled from the glucose metabolism pathway.
It works by increasing glucose transport and aerobic glycolysis. But during this time of life, as estrogen wanes, it be comes uncoupled from the glucose metabolism pathway.
Many cancer cells are especially dependent on aerobic glycolysis for energy and metabolites.
Under various conditions, mammalian sperm provide their energy requirements by anaerobic glycolysis, aerobic glycolysis and beta oxidation of endogenous substrates (including fatty acids).
Metabolic studies on isolated hair follicles: hair follicles engage in aerobic glycolysis and do not demonstrate the glucose fatty acid cycle.
Unlike normal cells, cancer cells metabolize glucose mostly via glycolysis, even in the presence of sufficient oxygen.[sup.5] This phenomenon of oncogenic aerobic glycolysis (as opposed to normal anaerobic glycolysis that takes place in the absence of sufficient oxygen) was first described by Warburg and is pathognomonic in clear-cell RCC for several reasons.[sup.5]