Adrianople


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  • noun

Synonyms for Adrianople

a city in northwestern Turkey

References in periodicals archive ?
On the European side of the Marmara, the indisputable highlight is Edirne, formerly Adrianople, formerly Hadrianopolis.
1913) Balkans: Turkey accepts an ultimatum from the protecting powers, demanding withdrawal from Adrianople.
1829 - Treaty of Adrianople guarantees Greece's independence from Turkey.
Commentators on the Condivi passage have rightly drawn attention to a letter of 1 April 1519 written to Michelangelo from Adrianople.
The capital of the Empire was moved to Adrianople in northern Bulgaria under John VIII Palaeologus around 1350, as Constantinople was taken by marauders from the east more than once.
Apart from the sufferings of the Romanian people during the Russian occupation, by the Peace Treaty of Adrianople, concluded on 2th/14th 1829, new elements were introduce which essentially changed the legal status of the Principalities.
Billed as a commemoration of the 150th anniversary of Bourchier's birth and the 80th anniversary of his death, it begins with the fall of the Turkish city of Adrianople in 1913 during the first Balkan war, an event which led to the liberation of almost all European territories of the Ottoman Empire.
Several centuries later the scene would be replayed outside the walls of Adrianople, where the great legions again fell to the sword, and Emperor Valens with them, at the hand of a desperate Gothic army.
It's not that difficult, actually: Adrianople (378), Arsuf (1191), and Bouvines (1214) come to mind at once.
The program shows vividly how a hundred thousand Goths formed huge columns like battering rams, and attacked the Roman lines at Adrianople.
By 1361, Muslims from modern day Turkey had captured Adrianople in Thrace.
The Emperor Baldwin lived only a few months before being captured in a great battle outside the city of Adrianople by the Bulgarians.
The book starts with clear and sensible treatments of the strategic situation faced by Valens with regard to the Gothic immigration, the nature and significance of the Battle of Adrianople, and the difficulties in choosing Valens's successor.
Delchev quickly became one of the leaders of the VMRO, the organization seeking to liberate the Macedonian and Adrianople Region Bulgarians from the Ottoman Empire, in its most successful period - 1894-1903.
In 1913, he participated as a commander in the Battle or Siege of Adrianople.