Adansonia


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Synonyms for Adansonia

References in periodicals archive ?
However, Josef Perner from Australia has confirmed that his company Cycad International supplied the trees and they are of the Australian Adansonia gregorii species from the Kimberley in the northernmost top of Western Australia.
According to prior research by the same authors, mopane is the dominant tree species found in the study area in association with Kirkia acuminata, Dalbergia melanoxylon, Adansonia digitata, Combretum apiculatum, Combretum imberbe, Acacia nigrescens, and Commiphora species [9].
Caracteres morphologiques et production des capsules de boabab (Adansonia digitata L.) au Benin.
Elamin, "The Potential of Baobab (Adansonia digitata L.) extracts as biocontrol on the growth and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus and A.
The dominant tree types are Lannea microcarpa, Adansonia, and Parkia biglobosa, with heights between 3 and 5 m and spacing of 30 to 40 m apart [14].
Adansonia digitata L., Fadogia ancylantha Schweinf., Ficus sycomorus L., and Myrothamnus flabellifolius Welw.
The polyphenol-rich baobab fruit (Adansonia digitata L.) reduces starch
Adansonia digitata (Baobab) fruit pulp as substrate for Bacillus Endoglucanase production.
Chris Dohse, managing director of Tree Crops, a Malawi-based manufacturer of wild plant ingredients, has watched a market in baobab (Adansonia digitata) grow almost out of nowhere.
Studies on the mucilages extracted from okra fruits (Hibiscus esculentus L) and baobab leaves (Adansonia digitata L.).
Salalah, February 28 (ONA) Tabaldi /Baobab / tree ( scientific name is Adansonia Digitata; English common names for the baobab include dead-rat tree, monkey-bread tree, upside-down tree and cream of tartar tree) is one of the rare, perennial, huge and endangered trees.
This is also the case with other plants from Africa such as the charismatic baobab tree (Adansonia digitata L.) that appears to have had a longstanding presence in South Asia.