ad hominem

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  • adj

Words related to ad hominem

appealing to personal considerations (rather than to fact or reason)

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References in periodicals archive ?
Piketty's second ad hominem is, surprisingly, against Yale University economist William Nordhaus.
Although both broad (including a wide range of deductive and inductive fallacies) and deep (including four subtypes of ad hominem, for example), its structure and prose make for an easy journey.
Ad hominems used to be grade-school errors of logic dealt with by the counsel of philosopher-morns everywhere: if you don't have anything nice to say, don't say anything at all.
Steinberg accuses animal advocates of a "sneering disregard for humanity" and "self-righteous delusion." Scrape away the bald ad hominems and the unpersuasive arguments, and there isn't much left.
Myron Lieberman's foaming ad hominems against us, against other researchers, and against the Kappan certainly do not merit a response.
As for ad hominems, Warraq remarks at the book's outset that following the Rushdie affair, the Muslim world needs to learn to live with such unfettered speech and asserts his "right to criticize everything and anything in Islam--even to blaspheme, to make errors, to satirize, and mock."
He was a kind of egoist, but his writings, the authors say, "call into question our facile use of such notions as selfishness, self-interest, egoism, and their opposites, altruism and self- sacrifice." He did argue fallaciously, frequently presenting ad hominems, but Solomon and Higgins argue (disingenuously, I think) that "what Nietzsche does, to the horror of logicians and English composition teachers, is to call on us to rethink what we mean by 'logic' and what we condemn as 'fallacy.' " Finally, if, as Nietzsche insisted, the philosopher should be an example, then, despite the authors' attempt to argue otherwise, it is pertinent to point out that Nietzsche himself was a pathetic example and claim that this constitutes a kind of self-refutation of his work.
Moreover, our General Synod has not been a "demilitarized zone" but rather a space for shouting, name calling (homophobia being one of our favorite ad hominems), and gnashing of teeth.
Some in the mainstream press have also yielded to mean-spirited urgings and abusive ad hominems. Last year, a major metropolitan newspaper referred in an editorial to Senator Phil Gramm as "pond scum."
In our post-2016 political climate, ad hominems, despite being unethical, can manipulate voters by appealing to irrelevant foibles instead of addressing core issues.
Alarmists have nothing to offer to the debate other than ad hominems and other logical fallacies.