hepatitis A

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Related to Acute hepatitis A: hepatitis A virus, hepatitis, Acute hepatitis B
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Synonyms for hepatitis A

an acute but benign form of viral hepatitis caused by an RNA virus that does not persist in the blood serum and is usually transmitted by ingesting food or drink that is contaminated with fecal matter

References in periodicals archive ?
Acute hepatitis A virus revealed by acalculous cholecystisis.
Increasing trend of acute hepatitis A in north India: need for identification of high-risk population for vaccination.
(1) Acute hepatitis A: elevated aminotransferase levels with peak value above 500 U/L and negative serology test results for hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections; (2) Recent acute hepatitis A: elevated aminotransferase levels with peak value below 500 U/L and either evolving S/CO (positive to borderline or negative) or resolving aminotransferase values (normal AST level); (3) Resolved acute hepatitis A: aminotransferase levels normal; (4) Indeterminate: elevated aminotransferase levels below 500 U/L; neither evolving S/CO nor resolution of abnormal aminotransferase values.
Newly reported hepatitis C was the most common cause of viral hepatitis, accounting for 53.2% of cases, followed by acute hepatitis A (19.8%), acute hepatitis E (12.2%), and newly reported hepatitis B (10.8%).
(11.) Hussain Z, Das BC, Husain SA, Murthy NS, Kar R Increasing trend of acute hepatitis A in north India: need for identification of high-risk population for vaccination.
In adults, jaundice develops in 70% of cases of acute hepatitis A (14), 33-50% of cases of acute hepatitis B (15,16), and 20-33% of cases of acute hepatitis C (17,18).
After initial studies on the clinical features of the disease and subsequent development of safe and effective vaccines in the early 1990s, research on acute hepatitis A faded away.
Liver enzyme abnormalities and cholestasis can be detected in the course of acute hepatitis A infections and rarely with the Graves' disease.
A 17-year-old male developed Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) in association with acute hepatitis A infection followed by nephritic syndrome.
Clinicians should be advised that if acute hepatitis A and B have been ruled out, the potential for HEV should be considered.
In 2007, CDC was notified of a case of fulminant hepatitis A in a nontraveling household contact of an asymptomatic Ethiopian adoptee confirmed to have acute hepatitis A (immunoglobulin M [IgM] antibody to HAV [anti-HAV] positive).
International travel to regions where hepatitis A is endemic poses a substantial risk for acquiring hepatitis A, but this was reported by only ~4% of patients with acute hepatitis A in the Sentinel Counties Study.
All patients above the age of 12 years with clinical features consistent with acute hepatitis A and a positive serology for IgM HAV who developed acute liver failure were included in the study.
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