Aconitum


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Related to Aconitum: Aconitum napellus
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  • noun

Synonyms for Aconitum

genus of poisonous plants of temperate regions of northern hemisphere with a vaulted and enlarged petal

References in periodicals archive ?
We also used Aconitum 200C (I think I'm gonna die) and Rescue Remedy (five-flower Bach Remedy).
p Monkshood (Aconitum) They are often planted under trees or spring flowering shrubs at the back of a border, bearing tall spikes of helmeted flowers in blues and purples in the summer.
Aconitum carmichaelii "Arendsii" WHEN most other plants are fading, the tall spikes of Aconitum carmichaelii Arendsii open up, giving height and colour to the garden.
When most other plants are fading, the tall spikes of Aconitum carmichaelii 'Arendsii' open up, giving height and colour to the garden.
They lie there all summer, these laggards of the herbaceous border, the Red Hot Pokers (Kniphofia), Japanese anemones, Asters, Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia ``Goldsturn''), the Sedums, the monkswood Aconitum carmichaeli, and the ``Kafir Lilies'', growing fat with foliage and no hint of a flower until suddenly, when you think it's all over for another year, they produce a virtuoso performance.
Also at the back of the border, deep indigo monkshoods Aconitum carmichaeli, take over from the delphiniums.
Spascupreel contains Colocynthis 4 x, Ammonium bromatum 4 x, Atropinum sulfuricum 6 x, Veratrum album 6 x, Magnesium phosphoricum 6 x, Gelsemium 5 x, Passiflora incarnata 1 x, Chamomilla 3 x, Cuprum sulfuricum 6x, and Aconitum 5x.
Aconitum ferox, a very toxic species of the plant, grows in Nepal around the Himalayas.
* Monkshood (Aconitum) ( bearing tall spikes of helmeted flowers in blues and purples in the summer.
Monkshood, aconitum napellus, is a bit like a delphinium with spikes of blue flowers in summer.
It would certainly light up a yellow and blue border, and contrast wonderfully with inky-blue aconitum.
A pre-inquest hearing was told it was "more likely than not" because Mr Greenway, of Aldershot, Hants, had brushed against aconitum, also known as Monkshood.
These all make very good cut flowers but, beware; rather like a close relative, the monkshood, aconitum, the seeds are poisonous.
Aconitum Ferox or Monks' Hood is native to the Himalayas and was carried by Indians to poison wells to slow down invading armies.
But, if you choose to plant them, remember that the late show is staged by only one species, Aconitum carmichaelii, which originated in Russia and China, and that aconites have a drawback: the plants, and particularly the roots, are poisonous.