abortion

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  • noun

Synonyms for abortion

termination

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Synonyms for abortion

failure of a plan

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References in periodicals archive ?
6 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15-44 years, compared with 19.
The rare/needs approach's central view that fewer abortions are a good thing hampers the ability to recognize the profoundly negative consequences of reduced access to services.
According to Guttmacher, 161,100, or about 13% of all abortions performed in 2005, were described as "early medication" or chemical abortions.
Unveiled in April 2005, the initiative was so named because of its goal of reducing abortions by 95 percent in 10 years.
Early studies of the effect of parental involvement laws on minors' pregnancy outcomes yielded conflicting findings, possibly because substantial numbers of young women were able to obtain abortions in neighboring states that had no law.
Becky lived in Indiana, where state law required that young women seeking abortions obtain permission from either their parents or a judge.
Department of Health data released on July 27 show that 185,400 abortions were performed in England and Wales in 2004, an increase of 2.
The Legislature down in the Bayou State is following South Dakota's lead and working on an even stricter ban on all abortions.
They also pointed out that even Planned Parenthood and other abortion advocates acknowledge that fewer and fewer doctors are willing to perform abortions, and many abortion mills have closed down over the past several years.
In 1989, she helped Doug Wilder become governor of Virginia, overriding pro-choice purists who objected to Wilder's support of mandatory parental consent for teenagers' abortions.
Abortion rights are a growing political and health issue in Latin America, a region with some of the most restrictive laws and high incidences of illegal abortions.
Congress has more fanatical members than ever, none more so than newly elected Senator Tom Coburn, Republican of Oklahoma, who advocates the death penalty for doctors who provide abortions.
Men are rarely mentioned in pro-choice commentary, except to celebrate women's freedom from male control over their reproductive lives-though supportive partners of women who have abortions may sometimes be acknowledged as well.
28] While the Weimar government relaxed penalties for abortion, the Nazi government in 1933 enacted even harsher laws against abortion and contraception, and during the Second World War decreed the death penalty for those who continuously carried out abortions.
Yet several studies find that rates of depression and other mental ailments in women receiving abortions remain stable for several months, at least after a first-trimester procedure.