Abenaki


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for Abenaki

a member of the Algonquian people of Maine and southern Quebec

Synonyms

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
Target: Anson and Abenaki hydroelectric facilities, minority stake Brassua facility and majority stake in the Kennebec Water Power Co
One of the greatest challenges was training the actors playing Native Americans to speak western Abenaki, a dialect of the eastern Algonquin language spoken in the Plymouth region in the 17th century.
The Hunter's Promise: An Abenaki Tale is illustrated by Bill Farnsworth and will reach ages 7 and up with a lovely story of a mysterious wife and children who appear one winter out of nowhere to keep him company, but will not interact with others in the village.
He soon obtained some heirloom vegetable seed, which predated large-scale European settlements, from an Abenaki tribe in New Hampshire.
In contrast, material culture is seen with pieces from the Abenaki Native Americans.
William is a young sailor getting his start on the HMS Pembroke, an English naval ship, whereas Genevieve is Abenaki by birth but raised French.
She and her family were taken captive by Abenaki Indians in a raid in Charlestown, N.H.
She then shifts to an examination of how Abenaki film-maker and Stodo writer Lee Maracle incorporated the multiple voices of Mohawk and other Indigenous people in storytelling about the resistance at "Oka" and, in Maracle's case, in telling Indigenous women's stories, including her own.
World-renowned Abenaki filmmaker Alan is Obomsawin has done it again.
Akins is an accomplished musician, song writer and composer of traditional Abenaki music.
Somebody [Florens 39] goes on an old Abenaki trail: the Abenaki lived in the NY/VT/CT/lower Canada region.
For my research visit this past April 4 to 6, Canadian Museum of Civilization staff had laid out dozens of Abenaki wood-splint baskets as well as the wooden moulds used to guide the weavers.
A valuable part of this chapter includes the interviews with Native filmmakers Shelley Niro (Mohawk), Victor Masayesva (Hopi), and Alanis Obomsawin (Abenaki), to name a few.
As a young man of 24, he was on a hunting trip along a tributary of the Pemigewasset River when he was captured by Abenaki Indians and carried off to Quebec.