frog

(redirected from A frog)
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Synonyms for frog

References in periodicals archive ?
It is difficult to see a frog that is resting quietly in the water with only its eyes above the surface.
The children's parade will also have a frog theme: It's so easy to be green!
Meet the coqui, a frog native to Puerto Rico whose shrill "ko-kee" blends in with the other frogs and night noises of its homeland.
"Frogs" also offers a number of interactive components, including ones that invites visitors to examine the skeleton of the world's largest frog--the seven-pound African goliath--and learn how its skeleton allows it to outjump Olympic athletes; explore the stages of metamorphosis from egg to tadpole to full-grown frog; watch video clips of frogs jumping, swimming, walking, climbing, and gliding: activate recorded frog calls and overlap them to create a chorus; test their field of vision against that of a frog: gauge their "frog IQ" on a range of subjects from basic to obscure; and perform a virtual dissection.
A frog can jump a distance equal to 20 times its own length.
Getting a frog air-borne is a very individual thing.
When you draw a frog, do you always color it green?
A cross between a rain forest and a dimly lit disco, it consisted of a room with a small inflatable pool, humidifiers, and a large number of living larvae and beetles - in short, everything necessary to a frog's happiness.
A frog's intensive breeding requires a long hot season and highly qualified breeders with technical knowledge.
Fold the card to make a frog by following the diagrams.
She has loved them since doing a frog project in first grade.
But this didn't explain how a frog could walk on something wet, such as a rock in a stream or a branch in the rain.
Zoologist Tamatha Barbeau of Francis Marion University in South Carolina compares a frog's skin to a sponge.
Dale Roberts of the University of Western Australia in Crawley has found evidence of multiple paternity in a frog clutch arising from other behaviors.
Herpetologists like McKinnell agree that frogs are enormously vulnerable during early life cycle changes to hormonal variations, which may be triggered by pesticides and other toxins, creating an estrogen-mimicking effect which disturbs a frog's development.