worry

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Synonyms for worry

Synonyms for worry

to cause anxious uneasiness in

to focus the attention on something moodily and at length

a cause of distress or anxiety

Synonyms for worry

something or someone that causes anxiety

a strong feeling of anxiety

Synonyms

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be worried, concerned, anxious, troubled, or uneasy

be concerned with

Synonyms

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be on the mind of

lacerate by biting

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touch or rub constantly

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References in periodicals archive ?
Had we not worried, had we left the next course of action to the non-worrier in the house (you can be sure that if a household has one worrier, there is no room for another), there would have been a minor crisis, a lot of running around, pushing and pulling, twisting of tubes and knobs, while the hungry guests looked at the clock and wondered when their meal would appear on the table.
Worriers spend more time playing out past and future events in their minds, so they're more likely to remember conversations and details better.
Peshawar Lions won second position with 55 points and Peshawar Worriers remained at third with 40 points.
Our road to glory requires us to be warriors, not worriers.
Based on the findings, we can relatively confidently conclude that worriers tend to be I-Fs in Jung's typology.
Covonia found four types of sufferers: martyrs, complainers, worriers and non-believers.
Like most natural born worriers, I'm of the disposition to fuel my anxiety, so this week I started studying the Tibetan Book of the Dead.
gt;> The next biggest worriers are singletons, who are twice as likely to worry all the time, compared to married couples.
Iris Bell capitalizes on two big audiences with this book: dog lovers and worriers.
She says chronic worriers can sometimes think themselves into a mood disorder or other mental illness.
Worriers believe that they need to worry in order to be prepared for--or to avoid--the bad things that are going to happen to them.
Directed at the less secular (and more suspensive) worriers, it might have some effect.
These are issues that all the worriers over DPW management of American ports ought also to be raising.
What was once referred to as 'suffering with your nerves' has become an ailment that leads 21% of worriers to think about seeking medical advice.
Horn recommends that worriers focus on issues that they can address.