woolgathering


Also found in: Dictionary.
  • all
  • adj
  • noun

Synonyms for woolgathering

given to daydreams or reverie

Synonyms for woolgathering

an idle indulgence in fantasy

Related Words

dreamy in mood or nature

Synonyms

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
There is always woolgathering that goes on about this," Mott said.
Poets are notorious for dawdling, idling, lallygagging, woolgathering -- the outward manifestations of that condition of listening into which they have retreated, taking language with them.
And all along he has been turning out an occasional poem; sixty, most of them a single page in length, are collected in Woolgathering to memorialize, as a major thread, his inevitable thoughts about death and dying: "Now it may happen any time" ("Shadow Lines").
As, sitting there woolgathering, he dreamed that he was approaching Africa, on the other side.
Berkeley was, for all his woolgathering, never asleep at the switch" [43-44]); in his reference to the "playful verse attributed to Bishop Berkeley" in "Alethia" (100); and to Berkeley the philosopher in "China" ("the body as it must be in the mind of God" [84]).
I was off woolgathering and wasn't paying attention.
At ninety minutes without intermission, however, the piece as a whole comes off as choreographic woolgathering or, as one friend termed it, a big yawn.
This woolgathering tends to lead to the fantasy world of "shoulds" - a journey we must not allow ourselves to take.
He was woolgathering about the years when a flock of mallards passed high, unseen by the dog, circled once to a belated call, and departed.
Whether that system ever crossed the frontier into faith is a bit of woolgathering this book rarely indulges.
I was woolgathering about just such a hotshot on that exquisite morning as my hunting partner and I traveled between covers, when the dog of my dreams broke from shadowy scrub pines into a nearby field.