wonder

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Synonyms for wonder

Synonyms for wonder

one that evokes great surprise and admiration

the emotion aroused by something awe-inspiring or astounding

an event inexplicable by the laws of nature

Synonyms

to have a feeling of great awe and rapt admiration

Synonyms

to be uncertain, disbelieving, or skeptical about

Synonyms for wonder

the feeling aroused by something strange and surprising

something that causes feelings of wonder

have a wish or desire to know something

be amazed at

Synonyms

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References in classic literature ?
Like his subjects, the King looked on the lovely Elves, and no longer wondered that little Violet wept and longed for her home.
He had walked round the house and looked at the things he had known from his childhood; there were a few pieces of china which might go for a decent price and Philip wondered if it would be worth while to take them up to London; but the furniture was of the Victorian order, of mahogany, solid and ugly; it would go for nothing at an auction.
He was frankly horrified at the idea that had come to him, it was murder that he was meditating; and he wondered if other people had such thoughts or whether he was abnormal and depraved.
He wondered what strange insight might have led the old man to surmise what strange desires were in Philip's mind.
He wondered why they had dug a great hole in the ground merely to bury dry bones.
Presently his keen eyes caught the faintest suspicion of smoke on the far northern horizon, and he wondered over the cause of such a thing out on the great water.
Ojo wondered if Scraps had stopped screaming, or if the folds of the leaf prevented his hearing her.
I shall be glad to see them," she said flatly; and then wondered if she really would be glad.
Alice wondered a little at this, but she was too much in awe of the Queen to disbelieve it.
And this day she was so perfectly stupid and awkward, that the Misses Osborne and their governess, who stared after her as she went sadly away, wondered more than ever what George could see in poor little Amelia.
How often she had mused on the subject, thinking of her friend abroad, Varenka, of her painful state of dependence, how often she had wondered about herself what would become of her if she did not marry, and how often she had argued with her sister about it
she wondered, but seeing the smile of ecstasy these reminiscences called up, she felt that the impression she had made had been very good.