neurosis

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Related to war neurosis: shell shock
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Synonyms for neurosis

Synonyms for neurosis

a mental or personality disturbance not attributable to any known neurological or organic dysfunction

References in periodicals archive ?
Ted Bogacz wrote in an article entitled War Neurosis and Cultural Change in England, that some of the earliest beliefs was that war neurosis resulted from concussions received as a result of shell fire, hence the name "shell shock.
In previous conflicts, the symptoms were covered by such loosely descriptive terms as combat fatigue, shell shock and war neurosis.
The line "[t]hese we can hold in check" suggests restraint which, consequently, causes repression that leads to war neurosis.
After World War I, Freud most famously begins to write about war neurosis, which leads him to propose the theory of the death drive, but also he begins to work more seriously on applying psychoanalytic concepts to collective forms of life.
As earlier research noted, to a significant degree, the soldier's expectation of outcome predicted recovery from war neurosis.
His discussion of the physical reaction of the body to extreme stress rests on a handful of books and memoirs, overlooking the wealth of literature on the related phenomenon of combat stress, war neurosis, and shell shock.
A history of changing attitudes to war neurosis chooses the other poet whose life and writing has done so much to define shell-shock's popular image, Siegfried Sassoon, quoting from 'Survivors', 'Men who went out to battle, grim and glad; / Children, with eyes that hate you broken and mad.
However, an evaluation of Karon and Widener's sources did not support the contention that memory recovery work helped war neurosis patients.
The book thus moves from the personal toward the political, analyzing the individual problem of war neurosis in its first chapter and the social problem of Armenian politics in its final chapter.
This latest resort of the psy-fi colonization of the outer space of "psychosis" for treatability or adjustment (for the survival of the species) was first brought to us by Freud's close encounter with war neurosis during World War I.
Same time, same station as the essay "On 'the Uncanny'," Freud's "Introduction to Psychoanalysis and the War Neuroses" characterizes the central conflict of war neurosis in terms of the internal doubling that pits one ego against the other one:
Officially, war neurosis was associated with hysteria and therefore simply seen as "madness caused by fear.