vulgarism

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  • noun

Synonyms for vulgarism

a term that offends against established usage standards

Synonyms for vulgarism

References in periodicals archive ?
The paper's top editors judged that in this situation, it was not enough to say merely that an obscenity or a vulgarism had been used.
I have heard many so-called jokes about our future queen - including references to this being the only wedding where the lucky horseshoe is actually worn by the bride, and vulgarisms about my brother getting his oats tonight.
Speaking of class, a group of Cardinal fans showed none when they poured insults, with all the Anheuser-Busch products and proper vulgarisms, on the Blues' Keith Tchachuk, who grew up in Boston and had the nerve to root for his home town team.
Burian was also criticised for forced rhymes and vulgarisms in his version of the text, and it was argued that while the adaptation brought more than one new and healthy element, the treatment of the material was in some cases excessively subjective.
These vulgarisms succeed in lightening the mood and, as Luther intended, getting the story out of church and into a dirty world.
British reviewers (including Spurling herself in Powell's own longtime venue, the Telegraph) expressed pained disgust at Barber's use of vulgarisms, specifically "up your arse," but it should be noted that David Pennistone, one of the few entirely charming and sympathetic characters in A Dance to the Music of Time, uses the very same phrase.
I miss the Chicago show years when the Windy City wrapped the CES in urbanity and natural vitality rather than in vulgarisms and synthetic delight.
Most translations for church reading try to avoid such unintentional misunderstandings, associations, and vulgarisms.
Mr Thwaite was dismayed by its 'bad grammar, pretentious barbarisms and vulgarisms which sound like stuff produced by third-rate advertising copywriters'.
This term--and not the vulgarisms that Hollywood seeks to cram into every line of every screenplay--is, need one say, the really obscene four-letter word of modern American life.
Cryle is undoubtedly right to draw attention to the dangers of anachronism, but such chidings are undermined by his own use of modern American vulgarisms ('dick', 'screw', etc.
On the lexical level, we can also point at vulgarisms, which are not often used in literature in this function--to present the unpresentable--but theoretically they can occur in regular language usage.
But what is most striking about the American personae assumed by the stilyagi was that these alternate personalities were built out of vulgarisms.
67) According to Stephens and Winkler 1995, 367, both texts contain 'a number of vulgarisms and uncorrected errors in both the prose and the verse sections of the text.