verse


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • noun
  • verb

Synonyms for verse

Synonyms for verse

a poetic work or poetic works

Synonyms for verse

References in classic literature ?
thank you, La Fontaine; you have just given me the two concluding verses of my paper.
La Fontaine placed himself at a table, and set his rapid pen an endless dance across the smooth white vellum; Pelisson made a fair copy of his prologue; Moliere contributed fifty fresh verses, with which his visit to Percerin had inspired him; Loret, an article on the marvelous
A poor devil - a youth, a lad who has been Bastiled these ten years, for two Latin verses he made against the Jesuits.
and, for 'two Latin verses,' the miserable being has been in prison for ten years
Sonya, shaking off some down which clung to her and tucking away the verses in the bosom of her dress close to her bony little chest, ran after Natasha down the passage into the sitting room with flushed face and light, joyous steps.
Whereupon he presently began to sing verses to the praise of God, which he had never heard, the purport whereof was thus:--
For verses, though never so well composed, cannot be literally (that is word for word) translated out of one language into another without losing much of their beauty and loftiness.
For he found that not only could he sing these verses, but he who had before been dumb and ashamed when the harp was put into his hand, could now make and sing more beautifully than could others.
He sang the creation of the world, the origin of man, and all the history of Genesis; and made many verses on the departure of the children of Israel out of Egypt, and their entering into the land of promise, with many other histories from holy writ.
11) Slight remains of five lines precede line 1 in the original: after line 20 an unknown number of lines have been lost, and traces of a verse preceding line 21 are here omitted.
Then Jim Hazard had a new verse, and one of the girls, and the Iron Man with the basilisk eyes of greenish-gray, whom Saxon recognized from Hall's description.
And so it went, verses new and old, verses without end, all in glorification of the succulent shellfish of Carmel.
After the dozen verses of "Root Hog or Die," Mark Hall claimed to be especially infatuated with:
Two thousand verses is a great many -- very, very great many.
All right, so far,' said the King, and he went on muttering over the verses to himself: `"WE KNOW IT TO BE TRUE--" that's the jury, of course-- "I GAVE HER ONE, THEY GAVE HIM TWO--" why, that must be what he did with the tarts, you know--'