verse


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Synonyms for verse

Synonyms for verse

a poetic work or poetic works

Synonyms for verse

References in classic literature ?
For he found that not only could he sing these verses, but he who had before been dumb and ashamed when the harp was put into his hand, could now make and sing more beautifully than could others.
He sang the creation of the world, the origin of man, and all the history of Genesis; and made many verses on the departure of the children of Israel out of Egypt, and their entering into the land of promise, with many other histories from holy writ.
La Fontaine placed himself at a table, and set his rapid pen an endless dance across the smooth white vellum; Pelisson made a fair copy of his prologue; Moliere contributed fifty fresh verses, with which his visit to Percerin had inspired him; Loret, an article on the marvelous
A poor devil - a youth, a lad who has been Bastiled these ten years, for two Latin verses he made against the Jesuits.
and, for 'two Latin verses,' the miserable being has been in prison for ten years
Whether or not any stanza form is as well adapted as blank verse or the rimed couplet for prolonged narrative is an interesting question, but there can be no doubt that Spenser's stanza, firmly unified, in spite of its length, by its central couplet and by the finality of the last line, is a discovery of genius, and that the Alexandrine, 'forever feeling for the next stanza,' does much to bind the stanzas together.
Whether true poetry or mere intellectual cleverness is the predominant element may reasonably be questioned; but on many readers Donne's verse exercises a unique attraction.
In vigorous reaction against the sometimes nerveless melody of most contemporary poets Donne often makes his verse as ruggedly condensed (often as obscure) and as harsh as possible.
After these verses had been spoken, all the Hellenes called for Homer to be crowned.
Here, again, the Hellenes applauded Homer admiringly, so far did the verses exceed the ordinary level; and demanded that he should be adjudged the winner.
But Homer, after losing the victory, went from place to place reciting his poems, and first of all the "Thebais" in seven thousand verses which begins: `Goddess, sing of parched Argos whence kings.
For these verses they gave him a silver bowl which he dedicated to Apollo at Delphi with this inscription: `Lord Phoebus, I, Homer, have given you a noble gift for the wisdom I have of you: do you ever grant me renown.
After this he composed the "Odyssey" in twelve thousand verses, having previously written the "Iliad" in fifteen thousand five hundred verses (5).
Next he went to Argos and there recited these verses from the "Iliad":
2) The verses of Hesiod are called doubtful in meaning because they are, if taken alone, either incomplete or absurd.