vernacular


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to vernacular: Vernacular architecture
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • noun
  • adj

Synonyms for vernacular

Synonyms for vernacular

a system of terms used by a people sharing a history and culture

a variety of a language that differs from the standard form

specialized expressions indigenous to a particular field, subject, trade, or subculture

Synonyms for vernacular

References in periodicals archive ?
Part 1 examines Chinese vernacular fiction (baihua) in a historical perspective: its formation in the Southern Song and development in the Yuan and Ming, its generic changes in the late Qing and radical transformation in the May Fourth period.
As we have seen, vernacular names can be misleading, and no hard and fast rules apply.
And he suggests that the vernacular in language should be extended to all aspects of life with 'a vernacular mode of being and doing', thus returning it to its golden mean.
PowerReviews' patent-pending PowerTags([TM]) technology captures customer opinions in their own vernacular, making reviews more relatable and impactful for other shoppers.
The second is a collection of sermons recorded in the vernacular by the audience as they were preached in the vernacular by Giordano da Pisa.
He added that reading vernacular literature would educate our young about distant regions that they may not be aware of - and make them more sensitive to the social, religious and cultural diversities of our country.
Conners regards the vernacular as "speech by everyday people" (39).
But this rite has two forms: the 'ordinary' liturgy (the 1970 Novus Ordo, celebrated in the vernacular language, or in Latin) and the 'extraordinary' (the Tridentine rite in Latin).
His output becomes a kind of pantheon of gravitas--or, in its use of vernacular text, antigravitas made vital by the intensity of Gallo's scribbles and his disinterest in pictorial nicety.
But all are recurring elements in Fagan's architectural vocabulary, developed over a long career in a series of outstanding houses (for instance, AR March 1995) and other buildings that fuse the principles and inspiration of modern architecture with lessons of local vernacular and historical structures.
The main difficulty seems to lie in the fact that, in the post-Babelian world, our exterior form of expression, language, is no longer able to grasp the essence of things; hence the necessity to arrive at a truly interior comprehension, which then could be voiced in an authentic language, the vernacular, as opposed to outdated classical idioms.
Because his own most recent experimental novel has been rejected by publishers as not black enough, Monk is outraged at the national success of Juanita Mae Jenkins, an amateur black middle-class writer with little knowledge and less actual experience of living in an urban black community, and at her exploitative first novel in the neo-realistic vernacular tradition of the ghetto pulp fiction of Robert "Iceberg Slim" Beck and Donald Goines, We's Lives in Da Ghetto.
Santa was also the final remnant of the county's freeway art, known as roadside vernacular, that saw its height in the 1930s and died out in the 1960s as freeways took over two-lane highways.
Montreal house mama Martha Carter was back, this time working the hip-hop vernacular with the group marta marta HoP.
While the title might suggest a treatment of the Roman de la Rose within a tradition of vernacular commentary on other texts, and while that theme is indeed treated intermittently, the major thrusts of the book divide between the Rose, and very specifically that part of it written by Jean de Meun, as an object of commentary in the later Middle Ages and an assessment of the steadily growing late-medieval corpus of commentary in the vernacular in France, Italy, Iberia, and England.