venture


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Synonyms for venture

Synonyms for venture

an exciting, often hazardous undertaking

something undertaken, especially something requiring extensive planning and work

to expose to possible loss or damage

to put up as a stake in a game or speculation

to run the risk of

to take a risk in the hope of gaining advantage

to have the courage to put forward, as an idea, especially when rebuff or criticism is likely

Synonyms for venture

an investment that is very risky but could yield great profits

a commercial undertaking that risks a loss but promises a profit

proceed somewhere despite the risk of possible dangers

Synonyms

Related Words

put forward, of a guess, in spite of possible refutation

References in classic literature ?
Only give a woman love, and there is nothing she will not venture, suffer, and do.
I paused at the same moment, feeling that I could venture no further without the risk of offending him.
Under such circumstances as these, to speak of my uncle's motives was to venture on very delicate ground.
You are the leader in this venture, Sir Nigel," the other answered, "and I do but ride under your banner.
As long as the prince doth me the honor to entrust this venture to me, it is for me only to give orders; and, by Saint Paul
for we must cover many a league ere we can venture to light fire or to loosen girth.
you have neither of you mentioned a word of that poor lad who deserves to be commended: to venture breaking his neck to oblige my girl was a generous-spirited action: I have learning enough to see that.
Not that the parting speech caused Amelia to philosophise, or that it armed her in any way with a calmness, the result of argument; but it was intolerably dull, pompous, and tedious; and having the fear of her schoolmistress greatly before her eyes, Miss Sedley did not venture, in her presence, to give way to any ebullitions of private grief.
Apparently he did not, and I refrained from pointing out the impossibility to him because, since he did not venture to say that "the girl" did not live, I felt no concern at his indignation.
Having secured my boat, I took my gun and went on shore, climbing up a hill, which seemed to overlook that point where I saw the full extent of it, and resolved to venture.
They, I observe, insult us mightily with telling us of the number of women; that the wars, and the sea, and trade, and other incidents have carried the men so much away, that there is no proportion between the numbers of the sexes, and therefore the women have the disadvantage; but I am far from granting that the number of women is so great, or the number of men so small; but if they will have me tell the truth, the disadvantage of the women is a terrible scandal upon the men, and it lies here, and here only; namely, that the age is so wicked, and the sex so debauched, that, in short, the number of such men as an honest woman ought to meddle with is small indeed, and it is but here and there that a man is to be found who is fit for a woman to venture upon.
To say that the woman should be the more easy on this occasion, is to say we should be the forwarder to venture because of the greatness of the danger, which, in my way of reasoning, is very absurd.
As for women that do not think their own safety worth their thought, that, impatient of their perfect state, resolve, as they call it, to take the first good Christian that comes, that run into matrimony as a horse rushes into the battle, I can say nothing to them but this, that they are a sort of ladies that are to be prayed for among the rest of distempered people, and to me they look like people that venture their whole estates in a lottery where there is a hundred thousand blanks to one prize.
But I considered how much this caution and indifference would give me the advantage over him, when I should come to be under the necessity of owning my own circumstances to him; and I managed it the more warily, because I found he inferred from thence, as indeed he ought to do, that I either had the more money or the more judgment, and would not venture at all.
After two or three ineffectual twitches at his dress, which he was hardy enough to venture upon, notwithstanding his dangerous humour, Mr Dennis, who burnt, for reasons of his own, to pursue the conversation, had no alternative but to sit as patiently as he could: waiting his further pleasure.
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