vagrant


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Synonyms for vagrant

Synonyms for vagrant

leading the life of a person without a fixed domicile; moving from place to place

Synonyms for vagrant

a wanderer who has no established residence or visible means of support

continually changing especially as from one abode or occupation to another

References in periodicals archive ?
An animal who made the reverse trip to Vagrant and company was Bouchamel, a greyhound who was beaten in the first round of a coursing stake at the Sutherland Meeting, near Dornoch, in November 1840.
Evidence is cited indicating that Beard's vagrant germ cells are what we now know as stem cells.
In fact, the pose from The Last Supper is at the behest of a female vagrant, Enedina, who claims that she is going to take their portrait, but instead just flashes them and laughs, which Bunuel dismisses as "una vieja broma infantil espanola" (quoted in Perez 123).
It pinpointed woodland near the hamlet of Pantyffynnon as the area where a vagrant, dubbed the "wolfman" by local children, was living rough.
The play shows how police were under pressure to move vagrants out of the city centre because of the eagerness of cities like Leeds to reinvent themselves according to now largely discredited ideas of progress.
FIREFIGHTERS were called to tackle a blaze at a derelict building in Birmingham where it was feared a vagrant was trapped inside.
HAVE FUN SURF HARD IF YOU WANNA BE A HOMELESS VAGRANT, BE IT
He looked like a vagrant," reports Lindsay Duncan, who plays Longford's wife Elizabeth.
For the Irish, preserving the road as a domain of white men was one of these key privileges, even if it confirmed among elites that the Irish were a race apart, sharing the same vagrant characteristics as African Americans.
He is seemingly unaware that set against what historians have learned about the actual lives of the early modern vagrant poor, English rogue literature appears as a major site of misrepresentation.
These vagrant personifications of cultural moods and memories tug at viewers' own experiences and fill in the considerable blanks that stand in lieu of plot.
It had been thrown out by vagrant Robert Sinclair, 55, who became seriously ill while living rough in the house.
A recent law that bars police from rousting homeless people from Beijing has expanded the vagrant population in a city unused to street people.
I was getting into my new role as North Carolina's premier amateur philosopher and religious studies scholar, and hoping for some in-depth discussion of my own "anti-Christian bigotry," as one of the state legislators put it, no doubt referring to my description, in Nickel and Dimed, of Jesus as a "wine-guzzling vagrant and precocious socialist.
When a vagrant couple accidentally tipped a burning candle into a pile of clothes, they set ablaze a 10-years-vacant cold storage building in Worcester, MA on December 3, 1999.