unprocurable


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Synonyms for unprocurable

not capable of being obtained

References in periodicals archive ?
The aforementioned Ni Fhaircheallaigh had even brought her French percolator and coffee, which was unprocurable on the island: in contrast with this luxury, the islanders drank a type of buttermilk and black tea.
The experiment should be such as to yield fruitful results for the good of society, unprocurable by other methods or means of study, and not random and unnecessary in nature.
23) Nuremberg laid out ten principles, including that subjects give voluntary consent, that the experiment "yield fruitful results for the good of society, unprocurable by other methods," that the experiment "be so conducted as to avoid all unnecessary physical and mental suffering and injury," and that the "degree of risk to be taken should never exceed that determined by the humanitarian importance of the problem to be solved by the experiment.
The Sudan People's Liberation Movement (SPLM) state acting secretary,Malou Moses Majok, said that "The resignation of the advisor, to me is unprocurable because" because he had not come to discuss the matter with them first.
Most of the novels discussed here are long out-of-print and virtually unprocurable in second-hand bookshops, especially the novels published by Hutchinson and its various imprints, including Skeffington and John Long, in the '30s.
In defence of this research I quote item 2 of the 1947 Nuremburg Code, which lays down rules for ethical medical behaviour in the field of medical research: "The experiment should be such as to yield fruitful results for the good of society, unprocurable by other methods or means of study, and not random and unnecessary in nature.
In addition, the Code demands that research be performed "as to yield fruitful results for the good of society, unprocurable by other methods or means of study.
A]nd if there were some necessity for relating them, a chosen few might hear them in a mystery after sacrificing, not a pig, but some huge and unprocurable victim.
Is it not legitimate to take risks with human beings to produce "results for the good of society that are unprocurable by other methods or means of study," as stated in the judgment passed fifty years ago on the Nazi concentration camp doctors by the Nuremberg Military Tribunal?