the pits


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Synonyms for the pits

any place of pain and turmoil

References in classic literature ?
John Carter shall die a natural death in the Pit of Plenty, and the day he dies Dejah Thoris shall become my queen.
When we reached the edge of the pit I saw that it was very deep, and presently I realized I was soon to judge just how far it extended below the surface of the court, for he who held the rope passed it about my body in such a way that it could be released from above at any time; and then, as all the warriors grasped it, he pushed me forward, and I fell into the yawning abyss.
As nearly as I could estimate, I had at this time been in the pits for three hundred days.
Finally I gave him a fair choice between freedom and the pits beneath the palace--the price of freedom to be full information as to where you were imprisoned and directions which would lead us to you; but still he maintained his stubborn partisanship.
Return him then to the pits and pursue the others and capture them.
U-Dor, dispatch those who will search the palace, the pits, and the city, and return the fugitives to their cells.
He saw the pit grow in depth until a great hole yawned the width of the trail--a hole which was amply large enough to hold at one time all of the six excavators.
Sniffing suspiciously, he circled the edge of the pit.
And now he perceived on one side of the pit a hole large enough to admit a person if he stooped and squeezed himself into a small compass.
A student who saw him remarked, "That's the way all bad governors should come out of their governments, as this sinner comes out of the depths of the pit, dead with hunger, pale, and I suppose without a farthing.
For a minute he scarcely realised what this meant, and, although the heat was excessive, he clambered down into the pit close to the bulk to see the Thing more clearly.
The rope came in tight and strained; and ring after ring was coiled upon the barrel of the windlass, and all eyes were fastened on the pit.
There was some smoke, and the Frenchmen were doing something near the pit, with pale faces and trembling hands.
By removing two stakes there would be left plenty of room for the lion to leap from the pit, which was not of any great depth.
If the pit I have been speaking of is the right one, a scene transpired there, long ages ago, which is familiar to us all in pictures.