tenebrous


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Related to tenebrous: fuliginous
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Synonyms for tenebrous

dark and gloomy

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References in periodicals archive ?
Ever painterly in disposition--the Sun King's cherished Caravaggista Valentin de Boulogne could have supplied the tenebrous lighting--Serra appears to have cast his film with an eye to art history: Women in the royal entourage resemble Ingres's Madame Moitessier or Titian's La Schiavona; several of Louis's courtiers suggest Liotard caricatures; and his Madame de Maintenon (played by Irene Silvagni) has the visage of one of Christian Seybold's alten Frauen.
In a novel that Harold Bloom has called "a parable as dark as any could be," inadvertently marking the Portuguese novelist as one of Horkheimer and Adorno's "dark messengers" ("The One with the Beard" 165), Saramago dialectically resolves the luminous and tenebrous with a Hegelian flourish.
If Clizia's transformation into a visiting angel promised a possible escape from the bleak and death-like reality of contemporary history through a transcendental celestial flight, the figure of a Christ-like Clizia, mainly coinciding with the Finisterre phase, the one referred to in 'II giglio rosso' for example, or 'Gli orecchini', directly pre-announces 'Iride' (originally included in the first edition of Finisterre): Iride is described as a more terrestrial half-human and half-divine pagan Christ figure who will save humankind by suffering and traversing the tenebrous historical reality of the Second World War and its horrors.
In other words, each of them represents a double system, consisting of a luminous celestial body (the perfect city) and a tenebrous celestial body (the damned city).
Their existence and treatment function as tenebrous yet public messages regarding who has the right to longevity and who does not; who has the right to education, the right to work, the right to just compensation, and the right to a roof over her head.
Johnny McKnight, better known for his out and out comedy roles, proved he is not a one trick pony - switching from saccharinely nauseating Sonny to the much more tenebrous Peter.
Luis de Gongora, "The Story of a Sick Traveler Who Fell in Love Where He Found Shelter" He lost his way, and in tenebrous night the wanderer stumbled, sick, confounded by the wilderness each way he turned.
In "Chiaroscuro," Sceab returns figuratively from the dead and his apparition becomes an occasion for the poet to consider the tenebrous relationship between life and death.
More generally the decision in Ronald provides a tantalising glimpse at the tenebrous nature of the art recovery industry.
Unlike the Surrealists freely attempting to access the depths of their dreams and sound the bottom of those tenebrous waters, war-veteran artists working in a "surrealist" mode are compelled by psychic trauma to produce objects that materialize the event of the trauma itself; even when successfully sublimating the trauma through artistic creation, these art objects can never completely erase the inciting incident.
But the musicians, on a balcony beside the portrait of the king, did not see his dance; their eyes were closed and they were swaying in their tenebrous alcove, as if the music was a thread they dangled by.
If so, I will be absent, but I denounce any plan to call her name at the next plenary session as a means of using Section 20 to obtain her undeserved and tenebrous confirmation," the senator said.
In other contributions, [6-7] we argued that the appearance of the other as a dim and fuzzy person or as a tenebrous and suspect one is a key feature of the life-world of persons affected by dysphoric mood.
He suggests that Hawthorne constantly deconstructs "rigid dualisms" (60), creating an atmosphere of uncertainty against a backdrop of enigmatic and tenebrous spaces.
Swirling holes emerge from tenebrous depths, forming apertures that impart eyes floating in deep space or resting gently on the borders between land and sky (1961; Fig.