tacit

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Synonyms for tacit

Synonyms for tacit

Synonyms for tacit

implied by or inferred from actions or statements

References in periodicals archive ?
The first variable is the degree of tacitness and lack of codification of the knowledge that such executives possess.
Hence, tacit knowledge can also be differentiated by its degree of tacitness (Ambrosini & Bowman, 2001).
Some characteristics of knowledge are not covered by the metaphor and remain hidden, like the non-rivalry and non-additiveness of knowledge (Lev, 2001) and the tacitness of knowledge.
As the role of knowledge and the learning organization has grown, the tacitness and explicitness of knowledge in the organization will become the key strategic consideration in shaping a competitive strategy (Abdullah and Ahmad, 2009).
In the specific case of outsourcing, the degree of tacitness of the knowledge required to perform and to manage the outsourced activity affects the potential benefits to be gained from outsourcing.
Jobe (2001) "Codification and Tacitness as Knowledge Management Strategies.
Open innovation requires diffusion, transferability, tacitness, appropriability and absorptive capacity.
Preventing knowledge from being imitated is all about activities that increase complexity, tacitness, and specialty of products or services (Ichijo, 2007).
Foray et Cowan, (1999), The Explicit Economics of Knowledge Codification and Tacitness, DRUID Summer conference on National Systems of Innovation.
The Explicit Economics of Knowledge: Codifcation and Tacitness.
Weick (1978) explains that school systems are considered loosely coupled because the following characteristics are present: indeterminate goals, variable raw materials, little control over causation, large spans of control, and unclear technology; furthermore, Weick contends, "Loose coupling also carries connotations of impermanence, dissolvability, and tacitness, all of which are potentially crucial properties of the 'glue' that holds organizations together" (p.
Gertler, 'Tacit knowledge and the economic geography of context, or the undefinable tacitness of being (there)', Journal of Economic Geography, vol.
This means that by its tacitness and social complexity, a firm's stock of knowledge is an important determinant of its competitive advantage, (Hoskisson et al.
In addition, capabilities are characterized by significant barriers to duplication, whether these are in the tacitness inherent in the skills of individuals or groups or in the complexity and specificity of organizational routines.