sumac


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Related to sumac: staghorn sumac, poison sumac
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  • noun

Synonyms for sumac

References in periodicals archive ?
The rash from poison ivy, oak, or sumac usually lasts one to three weeks," said Dr.
Anthocyanins and organic acids of the fruits of some species of sumac.
Initially, we removed the necrotic tissues and pieces of sumac and onion from the wound, and then repaired the avulsed penile skin.
Meanwhile, place the lamb on a baking sheet and press the sumac, coriander and Halen Mn sea salt all over the flesh.
A basket of baked pita crisps along with triangles of fresh pita bread arrived with a sauce of olive-oil, sumac, sesame seeds and thyme that made for good dipping and nibbling while ordering and waiting for the assorted appetizers.
Send $3 or $2 and stamps to: 222 Sumac St, Apt One, Philadelphia, PA 19128
Prehistoric people probably used sumac and bedstraw as dyes, Jakes says, because caches of those seeds have been recovered from archaeological sites although the plants have no known dietary use.
Along Marsal Tito Street (the main north-south thoroughfare in the east side of the town), large Habsburg commercial buildings like the Secessionist Landsbank by Josip Vancas and municipal ones like the girls' high school are stone shells overgrown with sumac bushes, pink, rose and cerise hollyhocks, snapdragons and orange jasmine.
The marsh is also home to several freshwater ponds, as well as staghorn sumac and black cherry trees, providing and important source of food for a wide variety of birds and mammals.
Poison sumac has much thinner leaves and grows into a tall shrub--but only in wet, swampy areas.
Despite the old mnemonic "leaves of three, let it be," 60% have no idea how to identify poison ivy, oak, or sumac.
Look for ground sumac in the spice section of a specialty food store.
Black Cherry White Oak Sumac Serbian Spruce Slippery Elm Hawthorn Japanese Maple Chestnut Yellow Wood White Ash Box Elder Stag Horn Chestnut Oak London Plane Grey Birch Paper Birch Red Horse Hickory Honey Locust Hackberry
Coiled baskets and other objects were woven primarily of native sumac (often dyed) and juncus grass, whose stem changes naturally from deep brown to tan as it grows.