suburbanize

(redirected from suburbanizing)
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Synonyms for suburbanize

take on suburban character

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make suburban in character

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References in periodicals archive ?
Sarna, American Judaism: A History (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2004), 282-93, for an overview of the religious background of newly suburbanizing Jews and the efforts of the Reform, Conservative, and Orthodox movements to satisfy their religious needs.
Focused on dramatically remaking the urban landscape for a new and rapidly suburbanizing world, Urban Renewal efforts were often indifferent to the plight of the residents of the low-income communities that were the object of improvement plans.
If, as Elfenbein argues, Cowper is at once beloved of the suburbanizing classes in the early nineteenth century, yet construed as either mad or a hermaphrodite, perhaps these classes wished to identify themselves with or incorporate the distinctiveness he represented, if only in a somewhat distanced or normalized manner, in part to craft the notion of the unique modern individual.
Like the downtown, Kitchener's core neighbourhoods fared poorly in the early suburbanizing years.
Yet more recently it has experienced intensive industrialization, with a consequent suburbanizing of the countryside.
But we are interested in the suburbanizing trend, and the data do suggest a dramatic growth in suburban population.
Meanwhile the opposite continues to happen - and today blacks are suburbanizing more rapidly than whites.
Road traffic and nearby grassland gird patterns in a suburbanizing landscape.
Also, in her study of Great Neck, New York, Judith Goldstein argues that what makes the story of this suburb interesting is that it does not conform to the normal pattern of mindless middle-classness and bland conformity exhibited by most suburbanizing Jews.
In the latter part of the twentieth century, job location followed population in suburbanizing, so much so that metropolitan areas can often be characterized as containing several large employment centers dispersed throughout the metropolitan area.