subordinate

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Synonyms for subordinate

Synonyms for subordinate

in a position of subordination

one belonging to a lower class or rank

Synonyms for subordinate

an assistant subject to the authority or control of another

a word that is more specific than a given word

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rank or order as less important or consider of less value

make subordinate, dependent, or subservient

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lower in rank or importance

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subject or submissive to authority or the control of another

(of a clause) unable to stand alone syntactically as a complete sentence

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References in periodicals archive ?
It also documents interesting correlations and causations in subordinate performance, such as addressing sexual harassment, work discrimination, and rights of subordinates from a mid-level management position.
This ranges from the detection and recognition of their own personal and performance problems, motivation and distribution of workloads, and managerial elements of task accomplishment in terms of followership and command execution to the assumption of an atmosphere conducive to positive subordinate performance.
The research sets forth pressures that affect logical judgments in a manager and subordinate performance, such as anger, environmental factors, and unfamiliarity of situations, all of which impact decision making.
Yet Rick's situation involves not lack of authority or expertise--they are adequately trained, have the necessary skills, and he wants them to take ownership--but lack of willingness on the part of subordinates to accept the level of empowerment offered by their manager.
How can we, as leaders or managers, expect our subordinates to help us achieve our hopes and dreams for the organization if they aren't even sure where we're leading them?
Kotter argues in his book Leading Change, a critical and unfortunately often-missing part of strategic direction is the ability of managers to sufficiently convey their vision to subordinates.
The results strongly suggest that physician executives' communicator style preferences are affected by whether or not they like or dislike the subordinates they are attempting to persuade.
According to Rubin, managing subordinates is one of the most singular responsibilities of physician executives.
One useful way to study how physician executives go about influencing their subordinates would be to examine their communication behaviors.
At a minimum, these subordinates need three things: An understanding of their job assignments; the training necessary to do their jobs; and regular appraisals of their work to reinforce satisfactory performance and correct substandard performance.
This article discusses the nature of traditional performance evaluation and then describes the relatively new idea of reverse evaluations, which allow subordinates to rate supervisors.
Evaluations allow supervisors to give feedback on how well subordinates meet expectations and to offer specific recommendations on what subordinates can do to improve performance.
Persuasion Strategies for Physician Executives: Part II Influencing Subordinates
Whereas Part I examined physician executives' strategic preferences in situations in which targets of influence were superiors with attractive or unattractive communicator styles, the current investigation explores whether there are any significant differences in the way physician executives go about influencing subordinates who communicate in an attractive style (i.
Respondents were instructed that the targets were subordinates with whom they worked and interacted on a daily basis.