squinch


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Synonyms for squinch

to peer with the eyes partly closed

Synonyms

Synonyms for squinch

a small arch built across the interior angle of two walls (usually to support a spire)

Related Words

crouch down

Related Words

draw back, as with fear or pain

cross one's eyes as if in strabismus

References in periodicals archive ?
The first panel in this squinch is occupied by a clumsily drawn female figure, her hair plaited in a tail.
Apart from the first panel in this squinch in which is depicted a long-necked vase out of which springs a bunch of nine symmetrically arranged stylized flowers, all the panels have one human figure each (figure 9).
It is probable that the central male and female figures in the northeast squinch represent Jahangir and Nur Jahan.
The presence of this figure leads me to wonder if the themes of the squinch panels also relate to episodes in the life of Krishna, or maybe Rama, the hero of the Ramayana.
Before RichFX, our squinch report took weeks to create and the photocopy pages were manually passed from department to department.
Actually he has fallen asleep on the living-room sofa, as he always does if he drinks a beer with lunch, and it is merely a ceiling light fixture that is causing his eyes to squinch.
SQUINCH (skwinch)--an old measure of snuff (a contraction of square inch) there being four pinches to the squinch [a small arch built across the interior angle between two walls]
Your delight, which is contagious, has been occasioned by the twinkling point of a steak knife about to liquify your eye, so when your father swats it from your prehensile fist you squinch your blooming face tight as a blastocyst as if all the world's pain had conceived inside your skull .
Either give it a context or else leave us with an image and throw a fast blackout before you squinch, squinch, squinch your way off to the showers.
The palace area consists of a sequence of courts leading into each other, and its much ruined buildings reveal the routine use of domes, pointed arches, pyramidal vaults, ribbed vaults, and squinch zones.
Other papers are devoted to more particular matters -- the hammer-beam roof over Westminster Hall, iron reinforcement in the Louvre, John Smeaton's use of hydraulic cement in the Eddystone lighthouse, and ribbed vaults and squinch arches in cathedrals.