snowy

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Synonyms for snowy

snow-covered

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Synonyms for snowy

marked by the presence of snow

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covered with snow

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of the white color of snow

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References in periodicals archive ?
Americans in the snowier regions are learning their lesson from last winter's damage, as those who don't currently have winter tires are now in the market for them.
has been experiencing a cooler, snowier March than last year, you might think that would slow the melt in the Arctic.
When I flew from snowy North Carolina to even snowier London recently the news was full of doom and gloom stories about the cold weather sending the UK into a triple-dip recession.
The winter of 1947 was snowier than 1962/63, but not as cold.
For the rest of his life winter was his season; the colder and snowier, the better he liked it.
It's cold up there in November -- often colder and snowier than in many parts of Montana and Alaska -- so a warm cabin usually forms the nucleus of the camp.
Extensive damage to a pervasive species under snowier conditions would leave gaps for another plant to take its place over time but could also alter the food-web for insects, voles, lemmings and their predators.
HAVING BEEN RAISED IN MAINE and worked there for many years, I am sure I experienced snowier, icier, colder winters.
The Dilmun Riding Centre had to sadly postpone its rodeo event to allow riders making a mass exodus off the island to snowier climes for Christmas to take part on their return, writes Helen Blake.
Further up, I did another U-turn and drove towards Sully on smaller and snowier roads, aiming to approach the airport from a less congested route.
Essentially, the public-sector snow was much snowier in its magnitude, depth and snowiness than the snow which affected the private sector.
It does prove one thing though, no matter where you are in the world the grass or desert is always greener or snowier on the other side.
While it's true that snowier, stormier winters could be the result of global warming, many meteorologists believe that El Nino--a climate pattern involving warmer-than-usual sea temperatures across the tropical Pacific that affects weather all over the globe--is mainly to blame for this past winter's ongoing white misery.