snake mackerel


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for snake mackerel

predatory tropical fishes with jutting jaws and strong teeth

References in periodicals archive ?
Aggregations at depths of approximately 100 m were composed mainly of Argentine anchoita (89% of the total catch), followed by American coastal pellona (7%), Atlantic cutlassfish (7%), white snake mackerel (7%), and rough scad (1%).
Our results reveal that there were 2 groupings of species that showed high occurrence and attained the highest biomass in specific water masses in the SBB in the spring-summer season: 1) the grouping that was strongly related to SACW and was composed mostly of Argentine anchoita, Atlantic cutlassfish, rough scad, piquitinga anchovy, white snake mackerel, and Atlantic chub mackerel and 2) the grouping that was formed mostly by Brazilian sardinella, flying gurnard, false pilchard, American coastal pellona, Atlantic thread herring, castin leatherjacket, and Atlantic bumper (Chloroscombrus chrysurus) and was strongly associated with CW and areas of mixing between CW and SACW.
An annotated and ilustrated catalogue of the snake mackerels, snoeks, escolars, gemfishes, sackfishes, domine, oilfish, cutlassfishes, scabbardfishes, hairtail, and frostfishes known to date.
Gempylidae, Snake mackerels (Scolars, Oilfisch), P.
In descending order of their proportion in the catch they were bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus), longnose lancetfish (Alepisaurus ferox), blue shark (Prionace glauca), mahimahi (Coryphaena hippurus), sickle pomfret (Taractichthys steindachneri), snake mackerel (Gempylus serpens), skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis), albacore (Thunnus alalunga), yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), striped marlin (Tetrapturus audax), escolar (Lepidocybium flavobrunneum), ono (Acanthocybium solandri), and shortbill spearfish (Tetrapturus angustirostris).
The snake mackerels Gempylidae are marine fishes that inhabit tropical and subtropical seas, often in very deep water (Nakamura, 1986, 1990; Nelson, 2006).
The abundance of stingrays, pomfrets, and snake mackerels has mushroomed 10- to 100-fold.