smalltooth sawfish


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  • noun

Synonyms for smalltooth sawfish

commonly found in tropical bays and estuaries

References in periodicals archive ?
What's left of the smalltooth sawfish population is confined to the lower peninsula of Florida, Burgess said, with the most important area ranging from Charlotte Harbor through the Ten Thousand Islands area of the Everglades into Florida Bay and the Keys.
Its close relative, the smalltooth sawfish, was listed as an endangered species in 2003 and survives in the U.
For instance, it appears that smalltooth sawfish don't reproduce until they're 3.
The United States has been developing a recovery plan for its domestic smalltooth sawfish.
smalltooth sawfish, "there's every chance that some of these markers will work for other sawfish [species]," he says.
Seven smalltooth sawfish have been captured in the shrimp fishery since mandatory observer coverage began.
Estimated incidental take of smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinata) and an assessment of observer coverage required in the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico shrimp trawl fishery.
You can tell the largetooth from the smalltooth sawfish as the largetooth only has 16-20 pairs of rostral teeth on its saw, while the smalltooth has 24-32 pairs of rostral teeth.
The smalltooth sawfish is now listed as endangered by NOAA, while both species are listed as endangered by international authorities.
Two species of sawfish occur in US waters, the smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinata) and the largetooth sawfish (P.
The smalltooth sawfish (Figure 1) is widely distributed, occurring in the western Atlantic from New York to Brazil (including the Bahamas and many of the Caribbean islands), in the eastern Atlantic from southern Spain to Gabon, in the Indian Ocean from southeastern Africa, Madagascar and the Red Sea to Bay of Bengal, and in the Pacific from the Philippines to Australia (Last and Stevens 1994).
Bigelow and Schroeder (1953) concluded that the smalltooth sawfish population in US waters included a migratory segment that moved along the east coast--north as temperatures warmed and south as temperatures cooled.
Sixteen loggerheads (nine released, four discarded, three unknown disposition), one leatherback (discarded), three unknown sea turtles (two released, one unknown disposition) and one smalltooth sawfish were caught in the SE US, and five loggerheads (one discarded, one released, three unknown) were caught in the MAB.
The high incidence of protected species interactions in the EGM, when compared to the SE US and MAB regions, was most likely due to heavy fishing in the Florida Key's region, where smalltooth sawfish and sea turtles more commonly occur.
Monitoring the recovery of smalltooth sawfish, Pristis pectinata, using standardized relative indices of abundance.