slice

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Synonyms for slice

Synonyms for slice

the result of cutting

a part severed from a whole

a thin piece, especially of tissue, suitable for microscopic examination

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to separate into parts with or as if with a sharp-edged instrument

Synonyms for slice

a share of something

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a serving that has been cut from a larger portion

a wound made by cutting

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a golf shot that curves to the right for a right-handed golfer

a thin flat piece cut off of some object

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a spatula for spreading paint or ink

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make a clean cut through

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hit a ball and put a spin on it so that it travels in a different direction

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cut into slices

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hit a ball so that it causes a backspin

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References in periodicals archive ?
He responded by slicing off her tongue and eating it," the paper quoted a source, as saying.
But he botched the killing, shooting the greyhound through the head and then slicing off the ears which had telltale identity tattoos.
Traditionally, Tete de Moine is served by slicing off the top rind of the wheel so that it resembles the bald pate of a Swiss friar (the name is French for "monk's head"), and then spearing it upon a device called a girdle that has a blade attached to the center pivot so when rotated over the top of the cheese, it shaves off paper-thin slices of cheese, creating enticing little rosettes.
In the advertisement, the hero is seen slicing off the arm of an opponent, Dr X, with a samurai sword.
Users of the Bazuca site, for example, can add a Domino's pizza as part of their order, and Bazuca then redirects the order via fax to Domino's, slicing off a commission in the process.
WAFERING: Slicing off the end of an illegally taken log to remove a brand, pain marks, or other tree- identification evidence.
In 1887, Lord Kelvin proposed an arrangement based on a polyhedron obtained by slicing off the six vertices of an octahedron (which has eight triangular faces) at a certain distance from each vertex.