slake

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Synonyms for slake

Synonyms for slake

satisfy (thirst)

make less active or intense

Synonyms

cause to heat and crumble by treatment with water

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References in periodicals archive ?
Table-1: Classification of lime with setting and slaking time
Gamble [8] suggested that slake durability index values that are taken after three or more cycles of slaking and drying may be useful for evaluating rock durability.
Further sample degradation cannot be compared because [25] performed only two slaking cycles.
In the desert Southwest, communities are slaking their thirst for knowledge with an outreach program that is overflowing with environmental health information.
In effect, he needed the other studios to keep slaking the movie-going habit, just as they needed him.
Tea-drinking rats developed fewer foci than did animals slaking their thirst with plain water.
Airport officials said the beer garden is expected to prove popular among plane maniacs and couples keen on slaking their thirst with a few cold ones while feeling the force of a jumbo jet's engine.
2005) have evaluated the effects of soil slaking on [K.
In this case, the aggregate sizes could influence the slaking, swelling, and dispersion processes, and consequently the way in which these processes affect the soil K.
1981; Shainberg and Letey 1984), another important mechanism of seal formation is aggregate disintegration caused by the slaking process (Lado et al.
In order to determine the effects of the slaking process on seal formation, Lado et al.
Structural stabilisation by organic matter can decrease soil wettability in smectitic soils because slaking is prevented.
Soil slaking is the process of fragmentation that occurs when rapid wetting produces failure of dry, unstable soil aggregates, as a consequence of differential swelling and pressure by entrapped air (Quirk and Panabokke 1962).
Visual observation of the degree of slaking and dispersion of samples from within the top 0.
Two distinct processes, slaking and dispersion, are involved in structural destabilisation during wetting (Emerson 1977).