set

(redirected from set the pace)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • verb
  • adj
  • noun
  • phrase

Synonyms for set

be set on or upon something

Synonyms

  • be determined to
  • be intent on
  • be resolved to
  • be bent on
  • be insistent on
  • be resolute about

set about someone

set about something

Synonyms

set out: embark

Synonyms

set out: determine

Synonyms

set someone against someone

Synonyms

set someone back

set someone off

Synonyms

set something against something

Synonyms

set something apart

Synonyms

set something aside: reserve

set something aside: ignore

set something down: write down

Synonyms

set something off: detonate

set something off: enhance

Synonyms

set something out: arrange

set something up: establish

set something up: assemble

television

expression

scenery

Synonyms for set

to deposit in a specified place

to put in or assign to a certain position or location

to alter for proper functioning

to arrange tableware upon (a table) in preparation for a meal

Synonyms

to place (a story, for example) in a designated setting

Synonyms

to bring about or come to an agreement concerning

to appoint and send to a particular place

to calculate approximately

to move (a weapon or blow, for example) in the direction of someone or something

to change or be changed from a liquid into a soft, semisolid, or solid mass

to make or become physically hard

set aside: to put an end to, especially formally and with authority

set back: to cause to be later or slower than expected or desired

set by: to reserve for the future

set down: to register in or as if in a book

set down: to come to rest on the ground

set forth: to state, as an idea, for consideration

set off: to endow with beauty and elegance by way of a notable addition

set off: to act as an equalizing weight or force to

set out: to work out and arrange the parts or details of

set out: to proceed in a specified direction

set up: to raise upright

set up: to bring into existence formally

set up: to pay for the food, drink, or entertainment of (another)

in a definite and final form; not likely to change

fixed and distinct from others

on an unwavering course of action

in a state of preparedness

a number of individuals making up or considered a unit

a subdivision of a larger group

a group of people sharing an interest, activity, or achievement

a particular social group

the properties, backdrops, and other objects arranged for a dramatic presentation

Synonyms

Synonyms for set

several exercises intended to be done in series

representation consisting of the scenery and other properties used to identify the location of a dramatic production

a relatively permanent inclination to react in a particular way

the act of putting something in position

a unit of play in tennis or squash

the process of becoming hard or solid by cooling or drying or crystallization

evil Egyptian god with the head of a beast that has high square ears and a long snout

Synonyms

the descent of a heavenly body below the horizon

Related Words

(psychology) being temporarily ready to respond in a particular way

any electronic equipment that receives or transmits radio or tv signals

put into a certain place or abstract location

fix conclusively or authoritatively

establish as the highest level or best performance

Synonyms

fix in a border

Related Words

set to a certain position or cause to operate correctly

disappear beyond the horizon

adapt for performance in a different way

put or set (seeds, seedlings, or plants) into the ground

apply or start

become gelatinous

Synonyms

Related Words

set in type

Synonyms

Related Words

put into a position that will restore a normal state

insert (a nail or screw below the surface, as into a countersink)

Synonyms

Related Words

give a fine, sharp edge to a knife or razor

Related Words

urge to attack someone

Synonyms

estimate

equip with sails or masts

Synonyms

get ready for a particular purpose or event

bear fruit

arrange attractively

(usually followed by 'to' or 'for') on the point of or strongly disposed

Synonyms

Related Words

fixed and unmoving

Synonyms

Related Words

situated in a particular spot or position

Related Words

set down according to a plan:"a carefully laid table with places set for four people"

Synonyms

Related Words

being below the horizon

Related Words

determined or decided upon as by an authority

Related Words

converted to solid form (as concrete)

Synonyms

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
After the winter testing ban ended it was former British Formula Three champion Pizzonia, of Brazil, who set the pace as he put Ralf Schumacher in the shade.
With a year-old bike, Hodgson was not expected to set the pace this weekend - but Edwards and world champion Troy Bayliss were left floundering as the Englishman set the pace yesterday.
With the industry's most far-reaching offering of tightly integrated, ultra-low power Gigabit Ethernet devices, and a staunch commitment to Gigabit Ethernet, the company continues to set the pace of innovation across market sectors.
On the Canyon boys' team, juniors Brian May and Aaron Thompson and senior Julio Ponce set the pace.
In 1995, retailers will help set the pace for the Westchester real estate market's recovery.
Under his leadership Reactivity will continue to expand its federal business and continue to set the pace of innovation in the XML enabled networking space.
Sixkissesforsara went to the lead at once, set the pace through fractions of :23.
Pratt & Whitney Canada is continuing to set the pace in aerospace with innovative engine programs," said Alain M.
With a history that includes 17 former Olympians and hundreds of national age/grade division champions, the Colgate Women's Games help set the pace for the indoor track season each year.
However this has not been the only growth segment, and the considerable industry movement over the last quarter will set the pace for future growth.