seedtime


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Synonyms for seedtime

the season of the year during which the weather becomes warmer and plants revive

Words related to seedtime

any time of new development

Related Words

the time during which seeds should be planted

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References in periodicals archive ?
If that was their bad situation, then God's promise that as long as the earth would exist, there would be seedtime and harvest, cold and heat, summer and winter, day and night, but there would never again be such a flood.
One is a call to lift up our voices in thanksgiving for the return of seedtime and harvest, for the gathering in of the fruits of the earth in their season.
31, 2007, which includes the Golden Week of National Day and the seedtime for the 29th Beijing Olympic Games, Brother Ltd.
In my seedtime, twenty-five years earlier, students of literature assumed that the function of criticism was to assist readers in understanding and enjoying poems and novels more fully than they might have on their own.
If Wordsworth's seedtime when "I bounded o'er the mountains" has fled, he can still revisit the "wild secluded" cliffs above Tintern Abbey.
The book, The Word of God, is one of a series of books being produced by Seedtime Publications.
God promises that he will not again destroy every living creature as he had just done, and says, "As long as the earth endures, seedtime and harvest, cold and heat, summer and winter, day and night, shall not cease.
In his journals (La Semaison, March 1960) Jaccottet makes the following very pointed remark: "It is not the heart that is inside, in fact the only real inside is precisely what its localisation cannot be properly applied to" (as cited in Seedtime, 20).
The unfailing cycle of seedtime and harvest, established after the flood, represents the element of promise and hope in time, and imitates in its shape the circling of the spheres.
To the Hebrew scripture writers, it seemed that only God could arrest the cycles of nature: 'Winter and summer, seedtime and harvest, shall not vanish from the earth.
The protector of day, Cuauhtli is Xipe Totec, god of the shedding of skins, god of seedtime, the elemental force of rebirth.
209), in relation to the heyday of the romantic adventure film in the 1930s- 50s, is derived from Clinton Rossiter's Seedtime of the Republic (1953): that it was a fight to defend existing liberties, which British "tyranny was attempting to remove, rather than to establish new ones.
The late-1940s, it seems, was quite a seedtime for such problems that are still with us: Kashmir, Palestine, Korea, Yugoslavia, Indonesia, Cambodia, and our very own Taiwan.
MacLeavy, Seedtime and Harvest: A Brief History of the Moravian Church in Jamaica, 1754-1979, Barbados, Cedar Press, 1979, p.