scurvy


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Synonyms for scurvy

Synonyms for scurvy

a condition caused by deficiency of ascorbic acid (vitamin C)

of the most contemptible kind

References in periodicals archive ?
Because no one, no matter how much you sex it up, is going to throw off their Slanket and jump from the sofa in excitement at the news Danish Scurvy Grass has been found growing on the verges of the busy M6 in the Midlands.
The prospect surfaced yesterday with the opening of an exhibition of ancient Royal Navy documents which includes evidence of how Captain Cook had earlier tried to tackle the scurvy problem by feeding his men sauerkraut.
98 days of easy sailing now followed but men were dying of scurvy and starvation.
Topics included whether post-war rationing was better for children than the 21st Century snack culture and if youngsters today are experiencing the nutritional equivalent of the Victorian age when rickets and scurvy were commonplace.
Cases of scurvy, caused by lack of fresh fruit and veg, rose 31%.
The high vitamin C content of the lemon has been used for hundreds of years to ward off scurvy.
The disease scurvy was caused by a deficiency of which vitamin?
It was a disaster as their ship was marooned for months and many of the sailors died from scurvy.
Priestley believed that religious liberty and science could be coupled together, and in the 1780s he 'succeeded in getting the Admirality to fit two warships with apparatus for the production of what we now call soda-water, in order, as he thought, to prevent the ravages of scurvy on board ships.
The old daily allowances were mainly geared toward preventing the relatively rare diseases, like scurvy, that result from dietary deficiencies of certain vitamins and minerals.
But Doc Martin discovers that Moysey is suffering from scurvy.
Scott's attitude towards him changed once the scurvy and gangrene set in.
Det Phil Redman said that tests on the wallet indicated it belonged to Briton Arnold Patrick Spencer-Smith, a member of a resupply team for Shackleton's expedition who died of scurvy in 1916.
All of this caused Federalist supporter Fisher Ames to declare that "pigsty" and "politics" were "two scurvy subjects that should be coupled together.
Peter Lloyd, prosecuting, said a postmortem examination conducted on Dylan found he died of scurvy, a rare disease resulting from a deficiency of vitamin C.