schoolfellow

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Synonyms for schoolfellow

an acquaintance that you go to school with

References in classic literature ?
Hold out your other hand, sir," roars Cuff to his little schoolfellow, whose face was distorted with pain.
So the two old schoolfellows felt it to be, as, their dinner done, they turned towards the fire to smoke.
She was a perfect linguist, a first-rate artist, wrote poetry, and composed music; to the study of the latter she professed to be entirely devoted, following it with an indefatigable perseverance, assisted by a schoolfellow, -- a young woman without fortune whose talent promised to develop into remarkable powers as a singer.
They were not much interested in anything relative to Anne; but still there were questions enough asked, to make it understood what this old schoolfellow was; and Elizabeth was disdainful, and Sir Walter severe.
Her kind, compassionate visits to this old schoolfellow, sick and reduced, seemed to have quite delighted Mr Elliot.
Allen immediately recognized the features of a former schoolfellow and intimate, whom she had seen only once since their respective marriages, and that many years ago.
She might have met somebody on a visit who would have been a far better match; I mean at her schoolfellow Miss Willoughby's.
After a few months, he left the school where he had been so unhappy, and went to Birmingham to be near an old schoolfellow.
No, Cynthia is a protegee of my mother's, the daughter of an old schoolfellow of hers, who married a rascally solicitor.
A schoolfellow of Vronsky's and of the same age, he was a general and was expecting a command, which might have influence on the course of political events; while Vronsky, independent and brilliant and beloved by a charming woman though he was, was simply a cavalry captain who was readily allowed to be as independent as ever he liked.
Your favourite schoolfellow, Louis Manoir, has suffered several misfortunes since the departure of Clerval from Geneva.
Tom saw no reason why they should not make up this quarrel as they had done many others, by behaving as if nothing had happened; for though he had never before said to Philip that his father was a rogue, this idea had so habitually made part of his feeling as to the relation between himself and his dubious schoolfellow, who he could neither like nor dislike, that the mere utterance did not make such an epoch to him as it did to Philip.
When Maggie came, however, she could not help looking with growing interest at the new schoolfellow, although he was the son of that wicked Lawyer Wakem, who made her father so angry.
The boy shuns the society of others, creeps about alone, joins with repugnance in the amusements of his schoolfellows.