sands


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  • noun

Synonyms for sands

the region of the shore of a lake or sea or ocean

References in classic literature ?
It's also true that I was now setting out for this same place, to fetch the girl in to dinner, which brings us round happily to our former point, and starts us fair again on our way to the sands.
Something draws me to it," says the girl, making images with her finger in the sand.
Sail this boat the way you've seen a ship sailed, and you'll be across the sands before you know it.
You don't often come on to the sands, I think,' said he, 'for I have walked there many times, both morning and evening, since I came, and never seen you till now; and several times, in passing through the town, too, I have looked about for your school--but I did not think of the--Road; and once or twice I made inquiries, but without obtaining the requisite information.
Then she sat down and watched Billina, who was pick-pecking away with her sharp bill in the sand and gravel, which she scratched up and turned over with her strong claws.
My bedding lay upon a rug stretched directly upon the warm sand.
Nevertheless, whatever my start sprang from was prophetic; for, as I gazed, he started walking briskly in a bee-line towards us across the wide wet sands.
The latter stood in several places as much as a foot or a foot and a half above the surface of the sand.
Occasionally we returned to them and gave advice, such as, when they lay exhausted in the sand, unable to strike a blow, "Throw sand in his eyes.
It was dropping off in flakes and raining down upon the sand.
The sand scorches me," said the hunter, "as though it had just come out of a furnace; and not a cloud in this sky of fire.
Yep," came his low answer, "--an' thinkin' this sand is harder'n a cement floor.
The ancient Kings of Egypt conveyed the waters of the Nile to this place by an artificial canal, now so choked with sand, that there are scarce any marks remaining of so noble and beneficial a work.
Four sets entered the sand perpendicularly: by working with my hands I traced one of them two feet deep; and some fragments which evidently had belonged to the same tube, when added to the other part, measured five feet three inches.
Accordingly, the directors of that institution consulted many persons who were supposed to know what steps should be taken, and it was finally decided that the best protection against fire--which is what was feared--was not water but sand.