sahib


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
  • noun

Words related to sahib

formerly a term of respect for important white Europeans in colonial India

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
It was in that strange and sudden way that Mary found out that she had neither father nor mother left; that they had died and been carried away in the night, and that the few native servants who had not died also had left the house as quickly as they could get out of it, none of them even remembering that there was a Missie Sahib.
Petersen Sahib came in on his clever she-elephant Pudmini; he had been paying off other camps among the hills, for the season was coming to an end, and there was a native clerk sitting at a table under a tree, to pay the drivers their wages.
Now Petersen Sahib had ears all over him, as a man must have who listens to the most silent of all living things--the wild elephant.
Machua Appa pointed at Little Toomai, and Petersen Sahib looked, and Little Toomai bowed to the earth.
Little Toomai was too frightened to speak, but Kala Nag was behind him, and Toomai made a sign with his hand, and the elephant caught him up in his trunk and held him level with Pudmini's forehead, in front of the great Petersen Sahib.
said Petersen Sahib, smiling underneath his mustache, "and why didst thou teach thy elephant that trick?
He is a very bad boy, and he will end in a jail, Sahib.
Remember, though, that Keddahs are not good for children to play in," Petersen Sahib went on.
Petersen Sahib had noticed him, and given him money, so he felt as a private soldier would feel if he had been called out of the ranks and praised by his commander-in-chief.
What did Petersen Sahib mean by the elephant dance?
Why should Petersen Sahib have chosen me to go down with you donkeys of the rice fields?
Then the elephants were chained by their hind legs to their big stumps of pickets, and extra ropes were fitted to the new elephants, and the fodder was piled before them, and the hill drivers went back to Petersen Sahib through the afternoon light, telling the plains drivers to be extra careful that night, and laughing when the plains drivers asked the reason.
Two hours later, as Petersen Sahib was eating early breakfast, his elephants, who had been double chained that night, began to trumpet, and Pudmini, mired to the shoulders, with Kala Nag, very footsore, shambled into the camp.
Thus he spoke in the vernacular: - "Colonel Sahib and officers of this regiment.
Colonel Sahib," said he, "that man is no Afghan, for they weep Ai