ruminate

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ponder

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References in periodicals archive ?
In this experiment, we aimed to induce offense-focused rumination by adapting instructions for a negatively focused writing condition in a study of the victim perspective by McCullough, Root, and Cohen (2006).
But sometimes, rumination becomes unproductive or even detrimental to making good life choices.
Fulton, "The Plight of Part-timers in Higher Education: Some Ruminations and Suggestions" in Change, Vol.
The language of Catholic philosophers has, from their earliest ruminations, bristled with words such as rights, justice, dignity, freedom, equality, and so on.
Road trips galore in this one--Louisville, Northwest, Arizona, tons of East Coast coverage, ruminations on the demise of Stone Edge, some characters you might recognize and a bunch you will never meet.
Here he's in Brussels, and ruminations include whether Tintin is a gay icon (all that hanging around with men with big moustaches and sailors), and the reason behind the famous Manekin-Pis sculpture.
To his credit, he tackles current concerns about authority and power inequalities in ethnographic work while avoiding the paralyzing effect that such ruminations have often exercised on many cultural anthropologists.
With theoretical ruminations in the introduction her text presents great stories enriched with detail.
However, his artsy ruminations about God did not ever mean that the Christian religion was particularly resonant for him.
Beattie will have won many admirers for his sensitive ruminations on the nature of loss for the Astle family - although he might have kept the three paragraphs on the accidental loss of "the memory card for my PlayStation 2" which is "a godsend on long away trips", to himself.
Morose existential cowboys, ruminations on fleeting love, fast chopsticks that kill, kill, kill, and a giant slug named Laura hitchhiking to Winnipeg - it looks like Canadian filmmakers have more up their creative sleeves than pallid adventures of an all-male curling team.
We are treated to endless ruminations between her and her husband Baruch, a New York assistant district attorney who, during Blumenfeld's sojourn in Israel, is called away to prosecute boxing promoter Don King for fraud (thus providing Blumenfeld with an opportunity to pad her narrative with some irrelevant trial detail.
Here you'll find ruminations on NYCB and modern dance; on NYCB and New York intellectuals; on photographer George Platt Lynes's fetishistic, nude reenactments of Balanchine works; on "watching music" and the making of Agon.