romance


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Synonyms for romance

Synonyms for romance

an intimate sexual relationship between two people

the passionate affection and desire felt by lovers for each other

a strong, enthusiastic liking for something

to attempt to gain the affection of

Synonyms for romance

a relationship between two lovers

Synonyms

an exciting and mysterious quality (as of a heroic time or adventure)

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a story dealing with love

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a novel dealing with idealized events remote from everyday life

make amorous advances towards

have a love affair with

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talk or behave amorously, without serious intentions

tell romantic or exaggerated lies

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relating to languages derived from Latin

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References in classic literature ?
sets forth with his court to a gallant hunting-match in Sherwood Forest, in which, as is not unusual for princes in romance, he falls in with a deer of extraordinary size and swiftness, and pursues it closely, till he has outstripped his whole retinue, tired out hounds and horse, and finds himself alone under the gloom of an extensive forest, upon which night is descending.
But as you are only a novelist, I compliment you heartily on your clever little pasticcio, adding, however, that as an account of what actually passed between myself and Hetty, it is the wildest romance ever penned.
James], conspicuous to all the world on his mountain-pile of history and romance.
Behind these words we use--the adventure, the novel, the drama, the romance, the situation, in short, as we most comprehensively say--behind them all stands the same sharp fact which they all in their different ways represent.
Weitbrecht-Rotholz belongs to that school of historians which believes that human nature is not only about as bad as it can be, but a great deal worse; and certainly the reader is safer of entertainment in their hands than in those of the writers who take a malicious pleasure in representing the great figures of romance as patterns of the domestic virtues.
He would have found it a shorter matter to make a new romance.
Somehow it seemed to her that he was helping her to understand what she had never understood; and in her gratitude she was conscious of a most sisterly desire to help him, too--sisterly, save for one pang, not quite to be subdued, that for him she was without romance.
Speaking of romance," said Priscilla, "we've been looking for heather -- but, of course, we couldn't find any.
I don't think you have any romance in you," she exclaimed.
The romance, and beauty, and high vigor of the books were coming true.
Was it regret for the conquest she relinquished, was it sympathy for her friend, or was it an uncontrollable overflow of feeling as she read some sad or tender passage of the little romance which she kept hidden away in her own heart?
And there was vastly more romance in being an oyster pirate or a convict than in being a machine slave.
Romance meant at first the languages made from the Latin tongue, such as French or Spanish.
Anne had sat among the stumps and wept, not without an eye to the romance of it; but she was speedily consoled, for, after all, as she and Diana said, big girls of thirteen, going on fourteen, were too old for such childish amusements as playhouses, and there were more fascinating sports to be found about the pond.
In continental Greece (1), on the other hand, but especially in Boeotia, a new form of epic sprang up, which for the romance and PATHOS of the Ionian School substituted the practical and matter-of-fact.