References in classic literature ?
If I put the ring upon the little finger of my left hand, then I can fly like a bird through the air wherever I wish to go.
When the youth heard all this he determined to try and get possession of the ring, though he did not quite believe in all its wonderful gifts.
He took back the ring, but put it in his pocket and not on his finger.
At this all laughed; but above all the laughter a loud voice was heard to cry out, "Sin' thou talkest so big, here cometh one from Nottinghamshire to try a fall with thee, fellow"; and straightway a tall youth with a tough quarterstaff in his hand came pushing his way through the crowd and at last leaped lightly over the rope into the ring.
No law can touch me to harm me, even if I slew him, so that it was fairly done in the wrestling ring.
I would that he had a fighting chance," said John Harned, facing the ring to see the second bull come in.
It ran around the ring in search of a way to get out.
Now show us how gracefully you can jump through the rings.
I've dropped a ring," he apo1ogised, as he climbed out.
There was an interval of hesitation, whispering, and smiles; but the expression of solemn emotion on the faces of the betrothed pair did not change: on the contrary, in their perplexity over their hands they looked more grave and deeply moved than before, and the smile with which Stepan Arkadyevitch whispered to them that now they would each put on their own ring died away on his lips.
Mr Pickering replaced the ring in his pocket, and, burying his head in his hands, groaned in bitterness of spirit.
On thinking the matter over, it must have occurred to him that it was possible that he had lost the ring in the road after leaving the house.
Then the murderer, or whoever it was, first took off this ring you call the nugget ring, then the wedding ring, and afterwards put the nugget ring back again.
It was a wonder the pedlar hadn't murdered him; men of that sort, with rings in their ears, had been known for murderers often and often; there had been one tried at the 'sizes, not so long ago but what there were people living who remembered it.
Do not reason about it, my philosphical reader, and say that Hetty, being very pretty, must have known that it did not signify whether she had on any ornaments or not; and that, moreover, to look at ear- rings which she could not possibly wear out of her bedroom could hardly be a satisfaction, the essence of vanity being a reference to the impressions produced on others; you will never understand women's natures if you are so excessively rational.