regrets


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  • noun

Synonyms for regrets

a polite refusal of an invitation

References in classic literature ?
I notice some regret in your voice," says Sandy, "and it is natural enough; but let bygones be bygones; you went according to your lights, and it is too late now to mend the thing.
But the thought came into my mind as a new reproach and new regret, when I was left so sad and lonely in the world.
Then comes remorse, with all its vipers, mixed with vain regrets for the past, and despair for the future
Nowadays most people die of a sort of creeping common sense, and discover when it is too late that the only things one never regrets are one's mistakes.
Of course I not only sent a servant at once to offer him my regrets and apologies, but I made them in person.
As a witty Frenchman has said, one of our most lively regrets is that while we are at the telephone we cannot do business with our feet.
Those waves and those breezes brought back too many remembrances, if not too many regrets.
Upon the whole, however, the trip had been sufficiently successful to satisfy all concerned; while the crew, and particularly Jacopo, expressed great regrets that Dantes had not been an equal sharer with themselves in the profits, which amounted to no less a sum than fifty piastres each.
In a case like that a man regrets that, as the proverb has it, he should have reached man's estate but not man's understanding.
I am disposed to admire and respect the 52-foot linear raters on the word of a man who regrets in such a sympathetic and understanding spirit the threatened decay of yachting seamanship.
After the Baron had done THAT, I should, for my part, at once feel free to express to him, whole-heartedly and without reserve, my own regrets.
She regrets leaving the tranquil retirement of this remote sea-side place--she dreads change.
He recounted, as nearly as he could, what had passed between himself and Kate that morning: speaking of her with such warmth of pride and affection, and dwelling so cheerfully upon the confidence they had of overcoming any selfish regrets and living contented and happy in each other's love, that few could have heard him unmoved.
There was a dull pang of regret because it was not the kiss of love which had inflamed her, because it was not love which had held this cup of life to her lips.
said Marianne, as she wandered alone before the house, on the last evening of their being there; "when shall I cease to regret you