reflex

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Synonyms for reflex

Synonyms for reflex

acting or happening without apparent forethought, prompting, or planning

imitative reproduction, as of the style of another

Synonyms for reflex

References in periodicals archive ?
After exercise cessation, lower preload in the upright position and the absence of central command mechanisms cause a drop in cardiac output and arterial blood pressure that is restored reflexly through increased sympathetic activity (Bradley and Davis, 2003, Westerhof et al.
In addition to the above voluntary ankle movement function, these peroneal muscles are also activated reflexly, during excessive ankle movements, to protect the ankle from injury.
The first solution is the one to which psychologists reflexly turn, given the overwhelming prestige of science in the field.
It is most likely to occur during that period when we are just getting the hang of how to get patients to talk about themselves and have not yet developed the critical faculty of not reflexly splitting the investigation of the psychosocial from the biological, which I call "learning how to embed the illness in the patient's life.
Rehabilitation of gluteus maximus may also be performed using sensorimotor stimulation in the form of balance shoes designed to reflexly recruit contraction of gluteus maximus.
A circular announcing the association's creation encouraged members to 'use their personal influence in favour of progress and reform in all necessary directions--and not, as hitherto, cast in their lot with the conservative, unprogressive Chinese, who reflexly acquire the worse features of the characters of the Peking anti-Reform reactionaries'.
Other hormones also influence sodium reabsorption, but are not reflexly controlled specifically for the homeostatic regulation of sodium balance.
This quietistic sublime is even more thought provoking when contrasted with the idea of the older, "terrible" sublime, which has been reflexly connected to the vast wilderness of the American continent, especially in European minds.