recess

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Synonyms for recess

depths

Synonyms

adjourn

Synonyms

Synonyms for recess

a pause or interval, as from work or duty

to interrupt regular activity for a short period

Synonyms

Synonyms for recess

a state of abeyance or suspended business

Synonyms

Related Words

an arm off of a larger body of water (often between rocky headlands)

an enclosure that is set back or indented

a pause from doing something (as work)

put into a recess

make a recess in

Related Words

close at the end of a session

References in classic literature ?
The Blackfeet had now a vast advantage, and soon dispossessed the poor Snakes of their favorite hunting grounds, their land of plenty, and drove them from place to place, until they were fain to take refuge in the wildest and most desolate recesses of the Rocky Mountains.
Unlike bolts and screws that have wrenching features or recesses located on their heads, aerospace pins employ an anti-rotation recess located in their threaded extremities as wrenching feature, as depicted in figure 1.
As noted by Nokken and Sala (2000, 104), regular recess appointments to major independent regulatory boards would allow presidents to "end-run an intransigent Senate by filling vacancies during recesses with hand-picked appointees who, presumably, would do his/her bidding.
evidence suggests that short recesses of ten or thirty days, which delay
a Washington-based Pepsi bottler, contended that a ruling by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) was invalid on the grounds that three of the five NLRB members who decided the case had been invalidly appointed during times that were not recesses.
a Washington-based Pepsi-bottler, contended that a ruling by the National Labor Relations Board was invalid on the grounds that three of the five NLRB members had been invalidly appointed during times that should not have been considered recesses.
While the Recess Appointments Clause was perhaps originally intended to ensure the continued functioning of the executive branch during the Senate's lengthy recesses, (4) presidents of both parties have exercised their constitutional powers under the Recess Appointments Clause for decades to appoint individuals blocked by opposing parties in Congress.
His administration argues that ''at least 14 presidents have, collectively, made at least 600 civilian appointments (and thousands of military ones) during intra-session recesses.
Based on Daugherty's interpretation, successive attorneys general have advised presidents of both parties that they have constitutional authority to make intrasession recess appointments, and all presidents since Ronald Reagan have made such appointments during recesses of between 10 and 14 days.
relatively short sessions and long recesses during the early years of
45) Although the Court has not opined on the issue, the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit held that the Recess Appointment Clause permits the President to fill vacancies, to assure the proper functioning of our government, during both intrasession recesses and intersession recesses.
It's unclear how a court might rule on a legal challenge, but it's worth noting that there is precedent for appointments made during recesses of less than three days.
The two-week recess has been held annually since the early 1990s, when then-Councilwoman Gloria Molina noted that Congress and the state Legislature built in recesses during the month.