ragged


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Related to ragged: Ragged right, Ragged array, Ragged red fiber
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Synonyms for ragged

Synonyms for ragged

torn into or marked by shreds or tatters

having a surface that is not smooth

Words related to ragged

being or dressed in clothes that are worn or torn

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worn out from stress or strain

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having an irregular outline

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References in classic literature ?
All beneath the fantastic limbs and ragged tree tops, which were, here and there, dimly painted against the starry zenith, lay alike in shadowed obscurity.
Or throw ourselves into those new clothes, so as to be ready," added the younger Kearney, looking down at his ragged trousers.
The country is the real thing, the substantial thing, the eternal thing; it is the thing to watch over, and care for, and be loyal to; institutions are extraneous, they are its mere clothing, and clothing can wear out, be- come ragged, cease to be comfortable, cease to protect the body from winter, disease, and death.
They judged it was him, anyway; said this drownded man was just his size, and was ragged, and had uncommon long hair, which was all like pap; but they couldn't make nothing out of the face, be- cause it had been in the water so long it warn't much like a face at all.
The last one helped the pure-white slave over the door-sill, and he limped away mopping his eyes with his old, ragged sleeve.
They saw a weed-grown, floorless room, unplastered, an ancient fireplace, va- cant windows, a ruinous staircase; and here, there, and everywhere hung ragged and abandoned cobwebs.
Well, when he come out I stood back out of sight, and then tracked him to a second-hand slop-shop and see him buy a red flannel shirt and some old ragged clothes--just the ones he's got on now, as you've described.
Fortunately books were scarce, or the children might sometimes have gone ragged and hungry.
Poverty looks grim to grown people; still more so to children: they have not much idea of industrious, working, respectable poverty; they think of the word only as connected with ragged clothes, scanty food, fireless grates, rude manners, and debasing vices: poverty for me was synonymous with degradation.
We crowded round, and over Miss Cathy's head I had a peep at a dirty, ragged, black-haired child; big enough both to walk and talk: indeed, its face looked older than Catherine's; yet when it was set on its feet, it only stared round, and repeated over and over again some gibberish that nobody could understand.
Over a spacious lawn, and behind a black plantation of firs, the rising sun rent its way upward through piles of ragged gray cloud; heavy drops of rain fell few and far between; the March wind shuddered round the corners of the house, and the wet trees swayed wearily.
Looking in at the door, after knocking in vain, I saw her sitting on the hearth in a ragged chair, close before, and lost in the contemplation of, the ashy fire.
The history relates that it was with the greatest attention Don Quixote listened to the ragged knight of the Sierra, who began by saying:
He was an uncouth fellow, ragged and dirty and unshaven.
I would go out into the streets to fight with my delusion, and prowling women would mew after me; furtive, craving men glance jealously at me; weary, pale workers go coughing by me with tired eyes and eager paces, like wounded deer dripping blood; old people, bent and dull, pass murmuring to themselves; and, all unheeding, a ragged tail of gibing children.