raft


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  • noun
  • verb

Synonyms for raft

a flat float (usually made of logs or planks) that can be used for transport or as a platform for swimmers

transport on a raft

travel by raft in water

make into a raft

References in classic literature ?
So I CHARTERED the raft and the crew and took all the responsibilities on myself.
All saw the danger, and the boldest, even the stout Friar himself, avoided setting foot on the raft.
All agreed with me, and we spent the day in building rafts, each capable of carrying three persons.
he cried, "it was I who gave you the idea of that raft.
I am an extremely unhandy man(my schooling was over before the days of Slojd); but most of the requirements of a raft I met at last in some clumsy, circuitous way or other, and this time I took care of the strength.
Not even a well found ship with a fair wind could venture on such a distant voyage: nothing that you can say or do shall make me go on board a raft unless you first solemnly swear that you mean me no mischief.
The bodies of drowned buffaloes floated past them in vast numbers; many had drifted upon the shore, or against the upper ends of the rafts and islands.
So the Woodman took his axe and began to chop down small trees to make a raft, and while he was busy at this the Scarecrow found on the riverbank a tree full of fine fruit.
He says he'll teach you to take his boards and make a raft of them; but, seeing that you know how to do this pretty well already, the offer, though doubtless kindly meant, seems a superfluous one on his part, and you are reluctant to put him to any trouble by accepting it.
While the carriage and horses were being placed on it, they also stepped on the raft.
The current flows toward the Winkie Country," said he; "and so, if we had a boat, or a raft, the river would float us there more quickly and more easily than we could walk.
It was upon this kind of raft that the travelers were to take their place.
When John Thornton froze his feet in the previous December his partners had made him comfortable and left him to get well, going on themselves up the river to get out a raft of saw-logs for Dawson.
I led him away from the path to the very centre of the raft of deals before the
When this was done I went down the ship's side, and pulling them to me, I tied four of them together at both ends as well as I could, in the form of a raft, and laying two or three short pieces of plank upon them crossways, I found I could walk upon it very well, but that it was not able to bear any great weight, the pieces being too light.