radial nerve


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  • noun

Synonyms for radial nerve

largest branch of the brachial plexus

References in periodicals archive ?
The recipient nerve of a CC7 nerve root could be a median nerve, radial nerve, musculocutaneous nerve, or triceps brachii nerve.
In the comparative NCS with median nerve, radial nerve has been preferred over ulnar nerve due to relatively rare occurrence of entrapment of superficial radial nerve.
There is a significant clinical and electrophysiological correlation seen only in ulnar and radial nerves.
The medial plantar branch of the tibial nerve, the median nerve, and the superficial radial nerve all demonstrated significant sensory improvement (P = 0.
Double nerve transfer like SA to SS and triceps branch radial nerve to axillary nerve were excluded from the study as it was difficult to access the functional outcome of shoulder abduction of either nerve transfer separately.
The radial nerve originates as a branch of the posterior cord of the brachial plexus.
Iatrogenic palsy of radial nerve is a common complication of dynamic compression plate as surgical treatment of humeral shaft fractures.
Radial nerve injury may occur with fractures involving distal humerus and careful assessment of animal's neurologic status is essential.
26) The radial nerve is located between 4 and 6 o'clock in 83% of cases, the median nerve is found between 9 and 12 o'clock in 88% of cases, and the ulnar nerve is between 12 and 3 o'clock in 85% of cases.
The subcutaneous tissue was dissected, taking care of preserving the branches of the superficial radial nerve.
It is common clinical practice to elicit symptoms with the neck in neutral, then to utilise neck lateral flexion as a sensitising manoeuvre to aid in structural differentiation, especially when suspecting more distal pathology such as carpal tunnel syndrome or radial nerve entrapment (Butler 2000).
Cumulative traumatic disorders that dental practitioners face are carpel tunnel syndrome, ulnar or radial nerve entrapment, pronator syndrome, tendinitis, extensor wad strain, and thoracic outlet syndrome.